Omega Fields

  • Omega Fields Spokespeople, Lee & Hallie Hanssen Interviewed on Horsemanship Radio, Episode 39

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields’ spokespeople Lee & Hallie Hanssen (https://www.omegafields.com/spokespeople-lee-hallie-hanssen/) were part of Horsemanship Radio Episode 39. They talked about how they produce happy healthy barrel horses as horse trainers and how Omega Fields products are part of their nutrition program for their futurity horses. You can listen to Epsiode 39 and all of Horsemanship Radio episodes on Omega Fields website by clicking on the Horsemanship Radio icon in the footer of the site (https://www.omegafields.com/) or use the direct link (http://www.horsemanshipradio.com/2015/04/30/horsemanship-radio-episode-39-by-index-fund-advisors-ifa-com-lee-hallie-hanssen-on-producing-happy-healthy-barrel-horses-trainer-carl-bledsoe-fan-of-gaited-horses/). Horsemanship Radio is an online radio show (podcast) dedicated to the exploration of good horsemanship throughout the world. Horsemanship Radio is hosted by Debbie Loucks, daughter of pioneer natural horseman, Monty Roberts. Horsemanship Radio is aired on the 15th and 30th of each month and is downloaded over 10,000 times each month. Omega Fields, Inc. is one of the sponsors of the Horsemanship Radio program (www.horsemanshipradio.com) featured on Horses In the Morning radio podcast (www.horsesinthemorning.com).
    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    Contact: Allison Kuhl _ Director of Business Development, Omega Fields, Inc. • (920) 550-4061 ext. 119 • Allison.kuhl@omegafields.com, www.omegafields.com

  • Omega Fields Spokesperson, Beverly Gray Interviewed on Horsemanship Radio, Episode 40

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields’ spokesperson, Beverly Gray, Endurance Riding legend, (https://www.omegafields.com/spokespeople-beverly/) was part of Horsemanship Radio Episode 40 that streamed this past Friday, May 15, 2015. She talked about how she got into endurance riding, the horses she has had throughout her career, and how she cares for and what she feeds her endurance horses.
    Beverly has been a professional endurance rider for over 2 decades, has received many awards from her rides and how she cares for her horses. She has logged over 18,500 competition miles, completed 350 races and has 100 wins.
    Learn more about Beverly’s favorite Omega Fields products that she uses each day – Mega Omega for herself (https://www.omegafields.com/people-products/mega-omegar.html) and for her horses – Omega Grande (https://www.omegafields.com/equine-products/omega-grande.html) , Omega SureGut (https://www.omegafields.com/equine-products/omega-suregut.html) and Omega Nibblers (https://www.omegafields.com/equine-products/omega-nibblersr.html).
    You can listen to Episode 40 and all of Horsemanship Radio episodes on Omega Fields website by clicking on the Horsemanship Radio icon in the footer of the site (https://www.omegafields.com/) or use the direct link (http://www.horsemanshipradio.com/2015/05/14/horsemanship-radio-episode-40-by-index-fund-advisors-ifa-com-endurance-legend-beverly-gray-and-horseman-marty-irby/#t=0:02.156 /).
    Horsemanship Radio is an online radio show (podcast) dedicated to the exploration of good horsemanship throughout the world. Horsemanship Radio is hosted by Debbie Loucks, daughter of pioneer natural horseman, Monty Roberts. Horsemanship Radio is aired on the 15th and 30th of each month and is downloaded over 10,000 times each month. Omega Fields, Inc. is one of the sponsors of the Horsemanship Radio program (www.horsemanshipradio.com) featured on Horses In the Morning radio podcast (www.horsesinthemorning.com).
    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    Contact: Allison Kuhl _ Director of Business Development, Omega Fields

  • USRider Introduces Omega Fields as New Premier Partner

    By: Lindsey K. Mulvany

    lmulvany@usrider.org

    1.800.844.1409 Ext: 106

    USRider Introduces Omega Fields as New Premier Partner

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2015) –USRider’s benefits program – Winner’s Circle Advantage – offers members exclusive discounts not found anywhere else. To its newly-added Premier Partners Program, USRider has added Omega Fields as the fourth Premier Partner.

    Omega Fields

    Your horses can count on Omega Fields’ Omega-3 rich, stabilized flax supplements and treats to restore cracked, brittle hooves, prevent sand colic, alleviate stiff immobile joints, soothe aching muscles, relieve skin problems and promote a shiny, healthy coat. With your USRider® membership, you are entitled to save 15% off the complete line of Omega Fields’ Omega-3 rich, premium products (excluding Omega Rice Bran). Omega Fields is honored to be of assistance in providing quality horse products made with stabilized flax for joint, hoof and skin coat health.

    The USRider Winner’s Circle Premier Partner Program allows USRider members to receive exclusive discounts. The three other Premier Partners are Purina, Spalding Laboratories and Riding Warehouse. To learn more information about the USRider Winner’s Circle Program, please visit usrider.org and visit the benefits page.

    USRider – in its 14th year of operation – is the only company to provide emergency roadside assistance for horse owners. Through the Equestrian Motor Plan, USRider provides nationwide roadside assistance and towing services along with other travel-related benefits to its Members. The plan includes standard features such as flat-tire repair, battery assistance, lockout services, and roadside repairs for tow vehicles and trailers with horses, plus towing up to 100 miles. As an additional service, USRider maintains a national database that includes emergency stabling, veterinary and farrier referrals.

    For more information about the USRider Equestrian Motor Plan, visit www.usrider.org online or call 800-844-1409. For additional safety and travel tips, visit the Equine Travel Safety Area on the USRider website at www.usrider.org.

    About the Equine Network

    The Equine Network provides, creates, and distributes relevant content and services to passionate horse enthusiasts while connecting them to each other and the marketplace. The Equine Network is the publisher of award-winning magazines: Horse & Rider, EQUUS, Dressage Today, The Trail Rider, Spin to Win Rodeo, American Cowboy, Practical Horseman, and Horse Journal. The Equine Network also publishes a proprietary line of books and DVDs for sale through its store, equinenetworkstore.com. The Equine Network provides emergency roadside assistance through its acquisition of USRider, and is home to several websites including: EquiSearch.com, Equine.com, MyHorseDaily.com, DiscoverHorses.com, Horse-Journal.com, and AmericanCowboy.com

  • Tips On Buying Horse Hay

     

    Written By: Krishona Martinson, University of Minnesota

    Listed below you will find some of the characteristics of hay that should be used to evaluate and select hay for horses.

    1. CONTENT: percent of grass and legumes in the hay. In general, legumes (like alfalfa and clover) have higher protein content than grasses. Fiber from grasses is more digestible than that of alfalfa and other legumes at the same stage of maturity. In many cases, pure alfalfa hay has more protein than the horse needs. Although this will not affect the horse's health, it will increases water requirements and cause more urination that is high in ammonia. Young horses that are developing have higher protein requirements, and alfalfa hay is an excellent supplement for them.
    2. NUTRITION: plants have more fiber and less protein as they mature. Indicators of maturity are flowers for legumes, and seed heads for grasses. Thick stems in both cases are indicators of maturity, remember, leaves have more protein and digestible energy and less fiber than stems. Usually, more leaves also means softer hay. Grasses harvested at early boot stage (when the seed head is just starting to form), have excellent fiber digestibility and energy availability.
    3. TOUCH: horses' mouth, lips and tongue, are very soft; hence, softer hay will be consumed more readily, and there will be less waste. If the hay feels rough to you, it will feel rough to your horse.
    4. SMELL: sweet smell is attractive to people and horses, and it is also a good indication of having readily available energy (sugar). Much like soft touch, a sweet smell is an incentive for the horse to eat the hay and get its full nutritional value.
    5. COLOR: Green is very appealing and a good insurance of quality, but don't get too hung up on color. Bleached color indicates exposure to sunlight or rain and very likely oxidation of vitamin A, but other very essential nutrients are still there! If in doubt, send a sample for a nutritional analysis. Be sure to require an equine analysis.
    6. CROP: plants that grow under cooler temperatures build more digestible fiber. Therefore, 1st crop hay may have more fiber, and the fiber will be easier for the horse to digest and use. Just knowing whether it is 1st, 2nd or 3rd crop does not predict nutrient content. The stage of maturity at which the hay was cut is the foundation of its nutritional value.
    7. MOLD: mold is detrimental if the horse inhales it, plus it has the potential to be toxic and/or upset the digestive system as well. Before buying a truckload of hay, be sure to inspect the inside of at least one bale. If the hay has been stored inside and is not moldy, then the risk of it getting mold is very low. Do not buy hay that is moldy, as it will only get worse. The use of propionic acid is safe for horses and can be used to prevent molding of hay at time of bailing.

    Permission granted for reprint of article from University of MN Extension. To read more articles from U of M Extension please visit their A to Z library >>>

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/a-to-z/

  • Choosing forages for horses

    Written By: Jennifer Earing, PhD, University of Minnesota

    Forage selection should be based on horse needs, as there is no one forage best suited for all classes of horses. For example, providing a nutrient-dense forage like vegetative alfalfa hay to 'easy keepers' can create obesity issues; however, that same hay would be a good option for a performance horse with elevated nutrient requirements. With so many forages available, how does one choose? Differences in the nutritive quality of forages (hay or pasture) are largely based on two factors: plant maturity and species.

    Maturity

    Regardless of plant species, stage of maturity significantly affects forage quality. Young, vegetative forages are very nutrient dense and contain fewer fibrous carbohydrates (hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin). As the plant matures (flowers and seed heads are indicators of maturity), the proportion of fiber in the plant increases, to provide structural support as the plant gets larger. The increased level of lignin associated with maturation interferes with the digestion of cellulose and hemicellulose by hindgut microorganisms, thereby reducing the digestibility of the forage. More mature forages also have lower energy and protein levels than their immature counterparts. Most horses do well on mid-maturity forages; horses with elevated nutrient requirements benefit from receiving young, less mature forages, while more mature forages are be best suited for 'easy keepers'.

    Legumes vs. cool-season grasses

    horse eating grass

    Legumes (i.e. alfalfa and forages) generally produce higher quality forage than cool-season grasses (i.e. orchardgrass, timothy, bromegrass, bluegrass and fescues); if baled at the same maturity. Often, legumes have higher energy, protein, and mineral (specifically calcium) content when compared to grasses at a similar stage of maturity, and are typically more digestible and more palatable. Legumes are an excellent source of nutrients for horses; however, a horse's nutrient requirements can easily be exceeded when fed immature legumes. Consumption of excess nutrients, particularly energy, may result in obesity. Legume-grass mixes or mid- to late-maturity legumes (less nutrient-dense) often provide adequate nutrients, without exceeding the horse's requirements. Average nutritive values of forages commonly fed to horses are shown in Table 1.

    The digestive system of the horse has been designed to efficiently utilize forages, and most horses can fulfill their nutrient requirements on these types of diets. Matching the nutrient levels in the forage to the nutrient requirements of the horse is one of the primary goals in forage selection. A variety of factors, including plant species and maturity should be considered when making this decision.

    Permission granted for reprint of article from University of MN Extension. To read more articles from U of M Extension please visit their A to Z library >>>

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/a-to-z/

    Table 1. General nutrient characteristics of forages commonly fed to horses

    Nutrient Cool-season grasses Legumes
    Digestible energy (Mcal/kg) 1.7-2.5 2-2.5
    Crude protein (%) 6-18 14-26
    Neutral detergent fiber (%) 55-65 35-45
    Acid detergent fiber (%) 30-40 30-40
    Calcium (%) 0.25-0.5 0.8-1.5
    Phosphorus (%) 0.2-0.4 0.2-0.35
  • LEADERSHIP - what can we learn from horses?

    WOULD ANYONE WANT TO FOLLOW YOU?

    --What can we learn about Leadership from horses? –

     

    Check out this book from Monty Roberts, Susan Cain and Debbie Roberts-Loucks, titled

    JOINING UP: What Horses Can Teach Us about Leadership

    oining up what horses can teach us about leadership

     

    In writing this book, authors discovered that the way we “show up” and influence animals is sometimes similar to the way we lead humans. Monty provides insights on how to develop personal leadership style that is capable of changing the world for horses and humans.

     

    Think of the last time you trained a horse or dog in your life? How did you communicate the training goal with the animal? During the training were you patient, impatient, anxious or calm?

     

    “Monty Roberts starts horses with a dedicated calm, clear communication and a great deal of patience. Think of this the next time you lead a group of humans or one human – patiently work through the process of elevating the performance of others by communicating clear expectations and assuming good intent.

     

    Learn More about Omega Fields Omega-3 treats for HORSES and DOGS – great training tool for horses and dogs! Omega Nibblers - https://www.omegafields.com/equine-products/omega-nibblersr.html

    Omega Nuggets - https://www.omegafields.com/canine-products/omega-nuggets.html

     

    Read more articles from Monty Roberts >> http://www.montyroberts.com/category/articles/

  • Determining the value of rained on hay

    Written By:Dan Undersander, University of Wisconsin & Krishona Martinson, University of Minnesota

    roundbale

    Frequent and above average rainfall fell throughout the Midwest during the summer of 2010, resulting in a challenging hay making season. Rain occurring while cut hay is laying in the field causes both yield and quality losses that reduce the value of the crop as an animal feed and a marketable commodity.

    Weather-induced losses are caused by:

    1. prolonged plant respiration reducing soluble carbohydrates and overall energy content
    2. leaching of soluble carbohydrates, protein, and certain minerals from the hay
    3. leaf shattering and loss, removing the highly digestible and high protein portion of the forage
    4. microbial activity metabolizing soluble carbohydrates and reducing energy content
    5. color bleaching

    How much does rainfall reduce dry matter yield?

    Several researchers have studied the effects of rainfall on cut alfalfa. Wisconsin researchers measured dry matter losses of 22% when alfalfa was exposed to 1 inch of rain after 1 day of drying (curing). Similar hay dried without rain damage lost only 6.3% of the initial yield. Losses appear to be greatest after partial drying of the forage has occurred. In this same study, alfalfa exposed to 1.6 inches of rain over several days suffered a 44% loss in dry matter. Michigan researchers conducted several different studies to examine the effects of rainfall on field cured alfalfa. The first study reported maximum dry matter losses of 34%. In a second study, rainfall intensity was kept constant at about 0.7 inches but spread over periods of 1 to 7 hours. Dry matter losses ranged from 4 to 13%, with highest losses occurring when the rain was spread over a longer duration. Overall, dry matter losses were much lower in these experiments even though rainfall amounts were about 2 inches.

    Other species have been studies as well. Yields losses of birdsfoot trefoil appear to be less than alfalfa, while red clover shows even less dry matter loss due to rain, and grasses suffer the least amount of dry matter losses. Dry matter losses are most crucial to the person responsible for baling the hay. Dry matter losses usually represent a significant decrease in income since less hay is available for baling, feeding, and selling.

    How does rainfall reduce dry matter yield?

    Three primary factors are involved in dry matter losses; leaching, respiration, and leaf loss. Leaching is the movement of cell solubles out of the plant. Components of the plant that are very water soluble are leached out of the forage and lost when rain occurs. Unfortunately, most of these compounds are those highly digested by the animal. They include such components as readily available carbohydrates and soluble nitrogen, minerals, and lipids. About one-half of the dry matter leached by rain is soluble carbohydrates.

    Unlike other livestock, losses of soluble carbohydrate can be beneficial for some horses. Laminitis is a painful and debilitating disease of the horse hoof. Laminitis typically occurs during periods of increased or rapid intake of water soluble and nonstructural carbohydrates. In order to manage lamintic horses and reduced amounts of carbohydrates in harvested forage, horse owners have resorted to soaking hay. A number of research trials have confirmed removal of carbohydrates from hay by soaking in either 30 minutes of warm or 60 minutes in cold tap water. Soaking hay is a cumbersome, messy, and time consuming process. Purchasing rained-on hay with naturally low levels of carbohydrates is a possible alternative.

    Respiration (breakdown of soluble carbohydrates by plant enzymes) occurs at nearly 2% dry matter per hour in fresh forage, and declines almost in proportion to the decrease in moisture content until the plant reaches approximately 60% moisture. Every time the forage is wetted by rain, respiration is either prolonged or begins again in cases where the cured forage was below 60% moisture. In either case, additional dry matter is lost.

    There is some disagreement in the research literature regarding the amount of leaf loss that occurs in cut alfalfa as a direct result of rainfall. In Wisconsin studies, leaf loss ranged from 8 to greater than 20% as a percent of the initial forage dry matter when rainfall amounts were from 1 to 2.5 inches. In Michigan studies, direct leaf loss was much lower (0.5 to 4.2%). Perhaps the issue of leaf loss from rainfall is a mute point. Experience and common sense tell us that rain damaged alfalfa is more predisposed to leaf shatter after it dries, and rainfall often means additional raking and more lost leaves.

    How does rainfall intensity and forage moisture affect losses?

    Research is conclusive on these two points. Given the same amount of total rainfall, a low intensity rain will result in more leaching of soluble compounds than a high intensity rain. Also, as forage moisture content declines, it is more prone to dry matter loss from rain. In Wisconsin rainfall studies, the maximum loss in dry matter (54%) was a treatment where 2.5 inches of rain fell on hay that was nearly dried.

    How does rainfall affect forage quality?

    Perhaps nothing is more frustrating than to see excellent quality alfalfa turn into unsuitable feed with each passing rain and subsequent raking. Most rainfall studies are in agreement that wetting of field dried alfalfa has little impact on protein concentration. For rained-on hay, it is common to see relatively high protein values in comparison to fiber concentrations, unless significant leaf loss occurs. With the leaching of soluble carbohydrates, structural fibers (acid and neutral detergent fibers) comprise a greater percent of the forage dry matter. Depending on numerous factors, the digestibility of rained-on hay may decline from 6 to 40%. Changes in fiber components are thought to occur by indirect mechanisms, where the respiratory activity of microorganisms has a concentrating effect on fiber components by oxidizing carbohydrate components; additional fiber is not made during the wetting process.

    Conclusion

    Rained on hay can be a suitable forage, but quality depends on several factors. Forage quality tends to retained if rain occurs soon after cutting when the forage has had minimal time to dry; the rainfall was a signal event compared to a multiple day or drawn-out event; rainfall intensity was higher versus a longer, lower intensity event; and the forage has not been re-wetter numerous times. Rained on hay is actually beneficial for horses prone to laminitis and other metabolic disorders because of its reduced carbohydrate content. Analyzing forage for nutrient content is recommended, but can be especially useful when determining the quality of rained on hay.

    Permission granted for reprint of article from University of MN Extension. To read more articles from U of M Extension please visit their A to Z library >>>

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/a-to-z/

  • Not all horses should graze

    Written By: Krishona Martinson, PhD, University of Minnesota

    horse grazing

    Recently, there has been a significant amount of interest in the sugar content of forage grasses. Pasture-induced laminitis (founder) can be triggered when susceptible horses ingest high amounts of sugar or fructans that are naturally found in forage species commonly grown in Minnesota. Susceptible horses include, but are not limited to, overweight or easy keeping horses, ponies, horses with metabolic syndrome, and horses that have foundered in the past. These horses should have limited grazing, or no grazing at all.

    Sugar content depends on the weather, plant stress, forage species, species maturity, time of day, and time of year. Any time forage species are photosynthesizing (producing energy from sunlight), the plants are producing sugars. When plant growth is limited from temperatures lower than 40° F or from drought, sugars normally used for growth will begin to accumulate in plants. During these plant stresses, susceptible horses should not graze. Minnesota's cool spring and fall weather can cause sugar accumulation, and increase the risk of pasture induced laminitis for susceptible horses. Anytime forage species are using sugars for rapid growth during warm weather or during respiration (using energy during dark periods) is a better time to graze. However, laminitis in susceptible horses can still occur if overeating is allowed. Better times to graze include cloudy days and dark hours.

    If the grazing is tied to exercise, consider using a grazing muzzle to limit the amount of forage the horse can ingest, and restrict the grazing to periods when the sugar content should be lower. Specifically, graze between 3 a.m. and 10 a.m., on cloudy days, and during periods when the night temperatures are above 40° F. Grazing in areas shaded by trees or buildings may allow longer access to grass as sugar accumulation will be less. Allowing pasture grasses to become more mature should also reduce the sugar content and will result in less (and a slower) intake. Grazing during these times or scenarios do not guarantee the sugar content will be lower.

    There are other factors to consider that contribute to sugar content. Some pasture species have a higher genetic potential to accumulate sugars under stressful conditions than others. These species include timothy, bromegrass, orchardgrass, and most cool season grasses that are commonly used in horse pastures in Minnesota. Most forage species store sugars in the bottom 34” of growth. Making sure pastures are not overgrazed will help avoid laminitis. Forage species store sugars when they are under stress. Make sure pastures are properly fertilized, and avoid grazing susceptible horses during drought and in the fall when nights are cool (less than 40° F). Keeping horses regularly exercised and in good body condition will help reduce the risk of pasture induced laminitis as well. Not all horses need to follow these recommendations, but susceptible horses should. Some horses should not be allowed to graze as their risk of foundering is too great.

    Permission granted for reprint of article from University of MN Extension. To read more articles from U of M Extension please visit their A to Z library >>>

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/a-to-z/

  • Field horsetail and brakenfern

    Written By: Krishona Martinson, PhD; Lynn Hovda, DVM, MS; and Mike Murphy, DVM, PhD, University of Minnesota

    field horsetail field horsetail

    Field horsetail

    Scientific name: Equisetum arvense

    Also known as: Scouring rush

    Origin: Native to North America

    Lifecycle: Perennial (lasting 3 or more years); reproduces by creeping rhizomes (underground stems) and spores (reproductive structures).

    Identification: Hollow, wiry, jointed stems, with 8 to 12 small, scale-like, whorled leaves. No flower is produced; instead, a cone-like structure is borne at the top of the stem. This cone-like structure houses millions of spores. Plants are 2 to 4 inches in height.

    Distribution: Found throughout most of the United States, with the exception of the southeastern United States.

    Habitat: Found in moist to wet soils, usually sandy or gravely in texture.

    Control: Horsetail is a relatively slow-spreading, non-competitive weed but, once established, field horsetail is very difficult to control. Very few herbicides provide adequate control and tillage may actually increase plant density by spreading the rhizomes. Correcting drainage problems or fencing horses out of wet areas populated with horsetail may be the best control measure.

    Brakenfern Brakenfern

    Brakenfern

    Scientific name: Pteridium acquilinum

    Origin: Native to North America

    Lifecycle: Perennial, reproduces by rhizomes and spores

    Identification: Fern-like leaf with plants reaching 1 to 4 feet in height. Spores are borne on the underside of each leaf in brownish bands.

    Distribution: Found throughout the United States.

    Habitat: Found in open pastures and woodlands, particularly on acid soils

    Control: Some herbicides exist for suppression and control of brakenfern but multiple treatments may be required. When using a herbicide, be sure to carefully follow all grazing restrictions and other pertinent information states on the herbicide label.

    Both plants

    Toxin: Brakenfern has several toxic syndromes in different species. This fact sheet focuses on the neurological syndrome in horses. Brakenfern contains a type I thiaminase enzyme. This enzyme both destroys thiamine and creates a thiamine analog. The analog appears to be absorbed and then interferes with a number of thiamine-requiring physiological processes. Field horsetail also contains thiaminase activity.

    When toxic: In both plants, the thiaminase enzyme activity is found in the plant tissues and is toxic when eaten fresh (in pasture) or dried in hay.

    Toxicity: A diet comprised of 20 to 25% brakenfern or field horsetail consumed for approximately three weeks is associated with neurological signs in horses. Clinical signs may develop after a week to ten days in horses ingesting a diet of nearly 100% brakenfern or horsetail.

    Signs and effects of toxicosis: Horses develop depression, constipation, and an unsteady gait usually in one to two days. Clinical signs progress to an unsteady gait, muscle twitching, going down, paddling, and seizing for a period of a week or more.

    Treatment: Thiamine or 0.5 to 1 gram initially, then decreasing daily doses for three to five days

     

    Permission granted for reprint of article from University of MN Extension. To read more articles from U of M Extension please visit their A to Z library >>>

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/a-to-z/

  • 8 Things I Learned from 8 State Hurricane Kate

    Written By Jenny Pavlovic

     

    With hurricane and summer storm season beginning, I was recently invited to be on a radio show called ‘Heroes of Katrina: Ten Years After – Hurricane Preparedness for Pets’. To get ready for the show, I reviewed my classic post, ‘8 Things I learned from 8 State Kate’, the cattle dog who was rescued after Hurricane Katrina and who later came to live with me as she recovered and I looked for her original family. I found the information to be useful still, and added updates from what I’ve learned in the past few years.

    8 State Kate

    While you may not live in hurricane country, your area is vulnerable to some type of severe storm and natural disaster. We live in Minnesota, where storms can cause flash flooding and knock out power, the river can rise rapidly and overtop its banks, and tornadoes blow through every summer. In the winter we get blizzards, which can also knock out power. The point is that everyone needs to be prepared for the type of disaster that can occur in their area. Being prepared means having a plan for your family, including your animals.

    Here are eight things I learned from 8 State Hurricane Kate.

    1. Microchip your pet. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, we learned how easily pets can lose their collars and IDs. A microchip implanted under the pet’s skin is the best permanent identification. I recommend a microchip even if your pet never leaves the house. A flood, tornado, hurricane, or even a surprise bolt out the door can separate you. A microchip is a small electronic chip with a unique ID number, in a capsule the size of a grain of rice. When a pet is found, the ID number is read by a hand-held scanner and the microchip company is notified. The company looks up the ID number in their database to find the owner. A microchip will only reunite you with your pet if you’ve registered your current contact information. Microchip technology has improved over the past ten years. A universal scanner is now available that can read the microchip number from any manufacturer.

    2. Keep good pet records, including a current photo of you with your pet (to verify ownership) and photos of your pet’s unique identifying characteristics. Store your pet’s vet, food, and medication records in one place (like The Not Without My Dog Resource & Record Book http://www.8statekate.net/wordpress/?page_id=1542). Include information on the pet’s daily routine, words the pet knows, and other useful tips for anyone taking care of your pet in an emergency situation. Make sure a designated person knows where your pet’s information is stored, in case something happens to you. Print the photos of you and your pet; don’t rely on photos stored on your phone. If power is lost, you may lose power to your phone too.

    The Not Without My Dog Book

    3. Make a disaster plan for your family and pets. Know the most likely natural disasters in your area. If you must stay home in a disaster situation, be prepared to survive without assistance. Assemble a kit to meet your family’s basic needs for at least three days. Store it in easily accessible waterproof containers. If you must evacuate, do not leave your pets behind. Have carriers, leashes, and harnesses for your pets. Know the local evacuation routes, how you’ll transport your pets, and where you’ll take them. Plan alternate destinations because emergency shelters for people often don’t allow pets, and pet-friendly hotels fill quickly.

    4. Make a family communication plan in case a disaster occurs while you’re separated. Know where your family will meet if you can’t reach each other by phone. Identify a neighbor or pet sitter who will get to your pets quickly when they need help and your family is away from home.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    5. Make sure your pets get good nutrition (including Omega Nuggets and Canine Shine) and are properly vaccinated, treated for fleas and ticks, on heartworm preventative, and spayed or neutered. Healthy pets are better prepared to survive anything, including displacement and housing with other animals. Accepted vaccination protocols are changing, and some flea and tick treatments are not approved by veterinarians. Do your research and decide what’s best for your pet.

    6. Socialize and train your pets. Help your pets learn to be confident in different situations. Positively trained pets are less likely to get lost. Make sure they know how to walk on a leash/harness and are comfortable riding in their carriers in the car. Teach them to wait before exiting the car by pausing, then giving them a reward. I feed my cat in her carrier twice each day. Since she’s used to going in the carrier and doesn’t think twice about it, I could easily load her into the carrier on short notice if needed. We also have a harness for her and put it on her regularly, so she’s used to it and I can remember how to put it on.

    kitty in window

    7. Tune in to your pets. They’re tuned in to you. Give them opportunities to do what they were bred to do. Help them relax and be confident. Appreciate them for who they are. The more connected you are to your pets, the better you will weather anything together.

    8. Be flexible and resilient. An old girl who has lost everything can recover with dignity and grace, and be happy. Kate taught me this too.

    This article includes information from Noah’s Wish, www.NoahsWish.org.

    The Not Without My Dog Resource & Record Book is available at www.8StateKate.net.

    Every year on June 2nd, in memory and honor of Katrina cattle dog Kate, we celebrate Kindness for Kate Day. On June 2nd, please perform a new act of kindness for a person or animal. We hope these new acts of kindness will become habits and make the world a better place. Thank you.

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