Omega Fields

  • Dr. Getty’s Tip: Calculating with PPM in Two Easy Steps

    Written By Dr. Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D.

    The trace mineral content of most feeds and supplements is provided in terms of parts per million (ppm). A ppm is the same as mg/kg (1 mg is a millionth of a kg).

    To do calculations, you need to convert lb or oz to kg using the following conversions:
    ·         1 lb equals 0.454 kg
    ·         1 oz equals 0.0284 kg

    Example #1: Your hay contains 140 ppm of iron.  How much iron is in 20 lbs of hay?
    Step 1: 20 lb X 0.454 kg/lb = 9.08 kg
    Step 2: 9.08 kg X 140 mg/kg = 1271 mg of iron

    Example #2: Your supplement contains 12 ppm of selenium in each ounce and you are feeding 2 ounces per day. How much selenium are you feeding?
    Step 1: 2 X .0284 kg/oz = 0.057 kg
    Step 2: 0.057 kg X 12 mg/kg = 0.68 mg of selenium

    Formulas to remember:
    ·         Convert lb or oz to kg: lb X 0.454 = kg; oz X 0.0284 = kg
    ·         Calculate to find mg: kg X ppm (or mg/kg) = mg

    About Dr. Juliet M. Getty

    Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. is an internationally respected, independent equine nutritionist who believes that optimizing horse health comes from understanding how the horse’s physiology and instincts determine the correct feeding and nutrition practices. She is available for private consultations and speaking engagements. Hear Dr. Getty address issues in horse nutrition at the Kirkland House Foundation in Delta, British Columbia, sponsored by “Hay…Girl!” on May 2, 2015. For more information, contact Pam Janssen at precioushaygirl@gmail.com or call 604-961-7265.

    Dr. Getty’s comprehensive resource book, Feed Your Horse Like a Horse, is available at Dr. Getty’s website, www.gettyequinenutrition.com, as well as from Amazon (www.Amazon.com) and other online book retailers. The seven separate volumes in Dr. Getty’s topic-centered “Spotlight on Equine Nutrition” series are also available at her website (where Dr. Getty offers special package pricing) and from Amazon (in print and Kindle versions) and from other online retailers. Dr. Getty’s books make ideal gifts for horse-loving friends.

    Dr. Getty’s website, www.gettyequinenutrition.com, offers a generous stock of free, useful information for the horseperson. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter, Forage for Thought; browse her library of reference articles; search her nutrition forum; and purchase recordings of her educational teleseminars. Reach Dr. Getty at gettyequinenutrition@gmail.com.

  • New Beginnings

    Written By Jenny Pavlovic

    The arrival of spring brought a wonderful message about a new beginning that brightened my day. Remember my 2012 story about the spirit dogs of Bimini (https://www.omegafields.com/blog/spirit-dogs-of-bimini/)? In March I received a message from Johanna, who rescued the yellow dog in the story that reminded me of my dog Cay. Johanna founded a rescue organization to help the dogs of Bimini. She wrote:

    Dear Jenny, I am the founder of Island Paws Rescue, a nonprofit dog rescue with a mission to save the dogs in Bimini. I recently came across your story of the Spirit of the Bimini dogs and realized that my dog Luca, is in the photo, known as yellow dog. We rescued him 2 years ago and then started the nonprofit. He's our love! What a small world… Please check out our fb page: https://www.facebook.com/IslandPawsRescue

    Johanna’s note reminded me that one person really can make a difference. I was elated to learn that Luca has such a wonderful home. The photo below shows Luca with another rescued dog he’s helping to foster.

    Luca at Home-c

    I felt the depth of Luca’s spirit back in 2012, and hoped he would find a wonderful home. Now he's helping rescue other dogs. How cool is that?

    Speaking of new beginnings… Have you ever experienced a moment when told someone your dog’s background and they responded that they never would have known that your dog was abused, or that your dog was a feral pup when you got her? And you paused for a moment, and realized just how far your dog has come, and how proud you are?

    Cay and I recently completed a therapy dog class. She learned all of the exercises, including walking through a crowd, accepting a physical exam by a stranger, and navigating around wheelchairs and other assistive devices. I remembered when Cay first came to live with us and it took two people to pull her out of the travel crate. Cay and her puppy littermates had been rescued in the wilderness in Tennessee. She was so afraid of everything, including being touched (http://www.8statekate.net/wordpress/?p=2375). After she’d had some time to settle in at home, I enrolled her in an obedience class. The first time we went to school she was so concerned about the activity in the room and anything happening behind her that she spent much of the night spinning around in a circle. Most of the first few weeks of class were spent helping her adjust to being there.
    Cay-c
    Over the months and years, Cay rode along with Bandit and Chase and me to herding activities and other dog events. She met new people, saw different animals, and got used to hanging out. Over time, Cay did the growing mostly on her own. We simply provided love, healthful food, a safe environment and good experiences. I hadn’t really noticed just how far Cay had come until her wiggly butt greeted strangers in the therapy dog class, and she decided that the wheelchair was her best friend once she discovered a treat on it. When I told people in the class she had come to us as a practically feral pup, they were surprised. And I experienced that moment…
    Cay and Chase-c
    In February, Chase and I visited the local elementary school for “I Love to Read” day. I read them the true story of Chase the Library Dog (share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=2Ics3LlsxYsl2). About halfway through the book, I realized that while the kids were interested in Chase’s story, they were pretty well preoccupied with snuggling and petting him. I thought for a moment that if I stopped reading the book and just faded into the background, Chase and the kids would continue to enjoy being together and might not even miss me. And that was ok with me.

    In March, Chase and I had a fun day at the library. We visited with the librarian and adult library patrons, including an older woman who petted Chase as she reminisced about her dog. Three super kids read fun books to us, and we got to visit with their younger siblings too. And I had one of those moments when someone asked me about Chase's background. I told them that we think he's a smooth coated collie-Australian cattle dog mix, and that my friend Sarah, who I met in Louisiana helping care for rescued animals after Hurricane Katrina, rescued Chase in Virginia. I remembered how Sarah saved Chase from a violent man who had stuffed him in a tiny chicken crate and was going to shoot him for chasing sheep. That Chase shook in fear on her lap for a couple of hours until he realized he was safe. And I thought about how amazed people are when I tell them that Chase loves everybody now and that he led me into volunteering at the library. I was reminded of the many miracles that brought Sarah and me and then Chase and me together. God must have been winking all along the way.

    School Visit-2c School Visit-3c

    March 15th marked one year since Bandit’s passing. We miss him, as we’ve been finding our way without him. We’ve had several visits from bald eagles that indicate his spirit is still with us. Several times per week a bald eagle flies over the highway in front of my truck, timing it just right. The week of March 15th, a bald eagle flew over our front yard when the dogsitter was outside with Chase and Cay. She texted me that "Chase was so funny today. We were playing catch for a long time and then an eagle flew over and Chase spent the rest of the time cry-barking trying to herd him in hahaha." This new dogsitter hadn’t known Bandit (our other dogsitter was on vacation). I replied that Chase talks to the eagles and that bald eagles were around a lot just before and after Bandit passed, and now I see them everywhere. She said, "It's a sign that Bandit is saying hi to his siblings!" It was a long week, but this made my day.
    As Bandit would say: “Be, Play, Love. Enjoy this day!”
    Dogs in Spring-c
    Happy Spring!
    Bandit-c
    Healthful food and Omega Fields Canine Shine and Omega Nuggets have been instrumental in supporting my dogs to grow up healthy and happy. https://www.omegafields.com/canine-products.html

  • Equine Back Pain

    Written By: K. Searcy, veterinary student, University of Minnesota

    Just as in people, back pain in horses is common and can be related to a variety of problems. Common complaints associated with back pain in horses include: restricted mobility; “cold-backed” behavior; refusing work; stiffness when making sharp turns; unwilling to change leads; loss of hind limb propulsion; and sourness with saddling or riding.

    If back pain appears to be an issue, owners should consider improper saddle fit, rider imbalance, sprains of the ligaments along the back, muscle injuries, vertebral fractures and bilateral lameness. To diagnose back pain, veterinarians can use a variety of methods, including direct palpation, radiographs, ultrasound, bone scans (scintigraphy), local anesthetics, physical examination, and thermography, to rule other sources of pain.

    Treatments for back pain can include:

    1. A combination of a muscle relaxant and an NSAID (phenylbutazone or flunixin meglumine)
    2. Regional injection of a steroid to decrease inflammation
    3. Dynamic stretches to engage and strengthen back muscles
    4. Shockwave therapy to improve circulation to the area and relieve muscle spasms
    5. Surgery to remove accessible bony eminences to alleviate pressure
    6. Acupuncture and/or chiropractic therapies to help with the pain and muscle spasms
    7. Aqua treadmill therapy to strengthen the back musculature
    8. Saddle fit adjustments
    9. Modified warm ups prior to exercise

    Permission granted for reprint of article from University of MN Extension. To read more articles from U of M Extension please visit their A to Z library >>>

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/a-to-z/

  • Arthritis in the knee

    Written By: Lauren Bullock, senior veterinary student, University of Minnesota
    Article permission from University of Minnesota Extension http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/a-to-z/

    A joint is composed of 3 parts: the cartilage, the synovial membrane, and the synovial fluid.

    If you have ever been diagnosed with degenerative joint disease, you understand what a horse goes through when diagnosed with arthritis. Arthritis is caused by wear and tear damage that hasn't been repaired. A joint is composed of 3 parts: the cartilage, the synovial membrane, and the synovial fluid. Cartilage covers the ends of the bones and is mainly used as a shock absorber. Cartilage lacks nerves. However, as the cartilage is destroyed, the underlying bone is exposed. Pain is due to the pressure on the nerves in the bone as well as the inflammatory agents found in the synovial fluid and damaged cartilage. Unfortunately, these inflammatory agents create more cartilage damage, leading to a vicious cycle.

    Treatment of damaged cartilage is difficult and often impossible in both horses and humans. This means osteoarthritis will continue to progress over time. Management of arthritis involves managing the pain and optimizing joint health. This will vary by the joint(s) affected and by the use of the horse. Your veterinarian may prescribe a combination of joint protectants (glucosamine, chondroitin), pain relief (phenylbutazone, firocoxib), and/or joint injections (corticosteroids, hyaluronan). It is also good to evaluate the need for weight loss, farrier work, altering exercise levels, and rehabilitation programs. These programs may vary by time of year and how your horse responds so it is good to have your horse re-evaluated on a regular basis.

    To read more articles from University of Minnesota Extension please visit >>

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/health/arthritis-in-the-knee/

  • Omega Grande Ambassador Panadero Breeding Season

    March-Summer

    Contact Lisa Alley-Zarkades at lalley@ethorn.com

  • CD13 Del Mar National

    Omega Grande Ambassador Panadero Event

    CD13 Del Mar National

    Del Mar, CA

    April 23-26, 2015

    eqconcepts@earthlink.net

  • Luis Lucio Clinic

    Omega Grande Ambassador Panadero Event

    Luis Lucio Clinic

    Peppertree Farms

    Poway, CA

    April 16-19, 2015

    www.facebook.com/margitdeerman

  • Antelope Island

    Omega Fields Spokesperson Beverly Gray Event

    April 10-12, 2015

    25/50/100 3 Days of Events

    Odgen, UT

     

  • Coastal Island Open Show

    Omega Fields Spokesperson Chad Crosby Event

    April 25, 2015

    Coastal Island Open Show

  • Aiken Spring Classic Finale

    Omega Fields Spokesperson Chad Crosby Event

    April 22-26, 2015

    Aiken Spring Classic Finale

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