Monthly Archives: February 2013

  • Omega Fields Launches National Television Spot on RFD-TV

     

    Newton, Wisconsin – On February 13, 2013, Omega Fields®, Inc. announced that it will air its first ever national TV commercial on RFD-TV through its partnership with Parelli Natural Horsemanship®www.parelli.com. On Parelli’s weekly RFD-TV show, Omega Fields will air a 30-second commercial featuring its award-winning stabilized flax-based horse supplement, Omega Horseshine®. This ad will air twice per week for the next 12 months during the Parelli program.

    Sean F. Moriarty, President of Omega Fields, Inc., said, “This is a great milestone for our company and we are really pleased to be partnered with the Parellis during their innovative and entertaining programs.”  This first commercial will air during the program "A Special Parelli Presentation – 2012 Performance Summit, Part 1 with Pat and Linda Parelli.”

    Be sure to tune in to the Parelli Natural Horsemanship RFD-TV programs.  The shows will air on consecutive Wednesdays at 9pm CST and Mondays at 5am CST beginning January 10th featuring Omega Field’s Omega Horseshine® commercial.

    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, goat, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    For further information, contact Allison Kuhl, Omega Fields Director of Business Development at 920-550-4061, ext. 119; email [email protected]; or visit www.OmegaFields.com or www.FLAX.com.

  • Omega Grande Receives Good HorseKeeping Product Approval

    We used Grande on our 24-year-old retired roping horse, which has severe arthritis and periodic cases of diarrhea.  Previously he had been on a total senior product supplement, as well as a mobility supplement.  After 30 days of being on Grande I was able to discontinue any additional supplements – except for a teaspoon of aspirin daily.  Bay has had a great winter, so far.  He has been alert, sound, and riding better then ever.  I am a true believer in the power of Omegas in keeping these older horses healthy and sound.  Like my show mare that I put on Horseshine after testing it last fall, Bay will be on Grande for the rest of his life!

  • HOW TO MAKE YOUR HORSE SMARTER

    Written By Walt Friedrich

    Feral horses are smart horses. Living in a vast geography, they know where all the water holes are, where to find the best grass, where the mountain lions hang out. Very smart, indeed – but it’s all built around feral living. The feral has much, much more learning to do before he’s capable of routine, daily life with humans – yet the domestic horses we live with and enjoy, same species, identical animals – seem much smarter by comparison. But not really – it’s just that they’ve had opportunity to further develop their minds. It’s said that the human brain is capable of so much more than it typically uses. Same thing with horses. The domestics just give us a clue about what’s possible – and their thinking powers can be quite surprising.

    To illustrate: Gail was riding her horse, Rocky, on a pleasant cross-country outing one warm summer day. Off in the distance, an interesting rock formation covered with wildflowers attracted Gail, and so she had Rocky leave the trail and walk through the brush toward it. The brush got thicker and thicker as Rocky plowed on, until he found himself unable to continue, with his legs tightly tangled in brush and vines. He was struggling to proceed, unsuccessfully, when Gail stopped him and asked him to stand still. She dismounted to examine the situation, saw that it was hopeless to plod through, and so she took out the small garden shears from her riding kit and calmly snipped away the entrapping vines, then led Rocky away from that patch of brush. Rocky followed her, calmly, and when clear, she remounted, patted his neck to tell him what a good, smart boy he was, and continued her ride.

    Many horses, in that situation, might have panicked, thrown Gail, hurt themselves in the process. But Rocky understood that Gail will help him out of any difficult situation; he kept his cool and allowed her to do so. He showed far broader comprehension of unusual circumstances than would a herd-raised horse without human experience. But what made Rocky capable of controlling panic so well? Why is he so smart?

    A horse’s lifetime is one of continuous learning. The two basic learning environments are his herd and the geography in which he resides. We’ll examine both, but first, let’s have a look at what happens between his ears, that makes it all possible -- the controlling factors that set the parameters for how he perceives and copes with those social conditions.

    Learning by developing his cognition:

    How he develops mentally is strongly influenced by what he views his physical limitations to be, what are his likes and dislikes, and does he know when he needs help, for example. But -- and this is tricky – we’re talking about understanding self-awareness in an animal, a challenging subject that’s difficult to define for even humans, about whom we do know something. It must be considered as the foundation on which knowledge is based because everything we see and understand is observed from a totally personalized standpoint. It seems unlikely that the relationship we humans have with our horses, as with our dogs, could exist if animals act only out of instinct. As we shall discuss, horses shape their behavior to fit the herd’s requirements; there seems to be some evidence, perhaps only intuitive, that they would do likewise in the company of humans. And it works both ways – a positive environment elicits positive attitude, and negative elicits negative.

    Learning from the herd:

    We know that the group environment is a highly influential factor in developing cognition. How smart a horse becomes is defined by the circumstances into which he is born and in which he develops – and it is a continuing process. Every event he experiences contributes to his fund of knowledge, and thus his intelligence. It follows, as studies confirm, that youngsters develop best in a herd environment, where its members have established complex interrelationships among themselves. The youngster comes to understand hierarchy, and that he must comport himself accordingly. But herd dynamics is much more than an unwritten rulebook – it’s also a blueprint for comfortable and safe living within a broad society, and to participate, he must learn it. The importance of the social environment cannot be overstressed. If you and I were to learn only at our mother’s knee until we were adults, we would be quite ill-prepared to exist in a society of people who developed within the broad panoply of school, playmates, close friends, neighbors, society in general. Likewise, a foal, growing up in such a group environment, will be far better prepared to cope with life’s events than one who knows only his mother and perhaps a few others during his developmental years.

    Not only does the foal learn the dynamics of living with his mother, he also learns the relative position of  every member of the herd toward himself, his mother and each other. Processing this data and understanding it, then living within it, develops his social intelligence so that he can quickly and efficiently continue the process going forward. Most importantly, this mental development forms the foundation for his ability to “fit in”, without unwarranted fear or anxiety, in new and different social situations. That means joining a new herd, for example, when he changes homes; it means handling show environments, joining strange horses in group rides, training experiences, and especially events with humans – as witness Rocky’s performance when tangled in the vines.

    Learning from the environment:

    Since a horse is such a physical animal and he lives in a primarily physical world, that physical environment is a major teaching aid in his mental development. It is the violin from which the music emanates. The objective is to allow the horse as great a range of experience as possible, with the understanding that the most threatening thing for many horses is, simply, change. But constant changeless environments set the horse up to react badly when change does occur. He learns to deal with changes by experiencing changes. Developing his experiences and thus his intelligence is squarely in our bailiwick. Keep him bottled up and we can expect him to be frightened of anything unfamiliar. But keep him in a complex social group and manage his terrain to promote frequent learning, and he will develop the ability to operate intelligently within his environment no matter how dynamic.

    Jaime Jackson recognized that a plain vanilla environment is a boring place, for domestic horse as well as human. He also understood horses’ need for constant movement in order to maintain physical condition. He developed the concept of the Paddock Paradise, a whole new way for the average person with a bit of land and a drive to practice optimal husbandry, to create a stimulating world for her horses, for their health and deep contentment. The difference between Jackson's approach and the usual fenced acreage is like the difference between an animal safari park and a zoo with barred cages. Creating physical, social, even emotional environments in which animals can believe they're in their primordial setup, yields fascinating results when applied to horses.

    Here's how Pasture Paradise works: instead of housing our horses in rectangular fields where they just stand in one spot and eat, an additional "inside" fence is added to create a "track" system. The track shape and width can vary - the narrower the track the more the horses will move. The topography can be changed quickly and easily, rock piles, sandy areas and water locations added. Hay can be piled in different locations within the track every day. The electric fencing can be moved to change the pathways, also allowing grazed areas to recover before being grazed again. The more innovative and creative our management methods become the more likely it is that we can create a real harmony between the needs of the horse and the space he lives in. It’s easy to change around, and it all can be done quite cheaply and quickly using electric fencing. It’s well worth the effort when you see how much happier and healthier he becomes. Horses adapt to such an extent that they look forward to changes in the route, watching while modifications take place. Once a change is complete they move into it without any need for pressure.

    The sum of the parts:

    The foal raised within the herd, an environment of diverse and interesting activity, builds a great deal of knowledge that influences his relationships, personality,  decisions and actions into and through his own adulthood – it makes him a “smarter” horse, very much better prepared for your teaching and training when he joins you as your equine partner. And when he is your partner, allow his natural intelligence to continue to develop in an environment of diverse and interesting activity. The more he learns, the greater his capacity to learn still more, and the greater will be your own pleasure and safety. It’s one of the best investments you can make.

  • Vitamin D

    Written By Dr. Kris Hiney

    Last month we began a discussion of what we currently know about the vitamin requirements in horses.  Unfortunately, the actual vitamin requirements for a particular horse are often hard to define.  Most vitamin requirements represent the amount needed in the horse’s diet to prevent the classic deficiency symptoms.  However, as stated previously, that may not be the same as the amount required for optimum health, well-being, or even performance.  It is certainly possible that the vitamin requirements for the horse might also alter with their stage of life, work load and management.  With this in mind, we will continue our vitamin discussion with the fat soluble vitamin D and what we currently know.

    Most individuals with some nutritional knowledge are familiar with vitamin D’s role in calcium absorption, and that it is synthesized  by the skin when exposed to sunlight.   However, the various precursors of vitamin D, and its active and inactive forms may be less familiar.  To provide some background, vitamin D is actually a steroid hormone.   Horses consume  vitamin D naturally from plants in the form of ergocalciferol, or vitamin D2.   In manufactured diets, vitamin D is typically supplemented in the form of vitamin D3, or cholecalciferol. Horses also synthesize D3  from skin exposure to ultraviolet light, through the conversion of  7-dehydrocholesterol into cholecalciferol.  Dietary  ergocalciferol and cholecalciferol are absorbed out of the small intestine and where it is converted to 25, hydroxycholcalciferol in the liver, or calcidiol.  Calcidiol is the compound that is typically used as an indicator of vitamin D status, as it closely reflects both dietary intake and skin synthesis.  However, horses do differ in the concentration of calcidiol in the blood in comparison to other animals, as it is much lower. All of the forms listed above represent inactive forms of the vitamin. One more reaction must take place in the kidney  before vitamin D is in its active form of the vitamin: 1,25- dihydroxycholecalciferol, or calcitriol. This final reaction is actually tightly regulated according to body needs.  More calcidiol will be converted to this active form, calcitriol, when needed.

    Activated vitamin D directly acts to regulate the amount of calcium and phosphorous circulating in the blood.  It can act to increase the amount of calcium in the body by increasing its rate of absorption out of the small intestine, and increasing reabsorption by the kidney.    Vitamin D promotes mineralization of the skeleton through its regulation of calcium, and deficiencies of vitamin D result in osteomalacia.   In young animals and humans, this is referred to as rickets.  While the function of calcium regulation is commonly known,  vitamin D is actually involved in the normal function of a variety of tissues.  Beyond bone health, vitamin D also has a role in in cell growth and tissue differentiation.  Vitamin D receptors have been found in all cell types in the body, emphasizing its much wider role in the physiology of the body.

    In human nutrition, vitamin D and its role in other body functions, particularly immune function, has been more fully explored than in any of our animal species.   Macrophages, large immune cells capable of engulfing pathogens, produce calcitriol locally.  Here vitamin D is used as a cytokine , or a substance released in response to the presence of an antigen, which acts as a cellular mediator and enhances the immune response.  In humans, low vitamin D status has been linked to cardiovascular disease, auto immune disorders, neoplasias, infectious disease and even psychiatric disease.  Of the autoimmune diseases linked to vitamin D deficiency, these include type I diabetes mellitus, Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.  Indeed many cancers have also been linked to hypo-vitamin D status.   However, with this said, large scale studies have been inconclusive, yielding conflicting results.    Recently,  supplementation of vitamin D in controlled studies was found to be ineffective in preventing the common cold or upper respiratory infections.  However, the possibility exists that some of the diseases listed above may actually result in the destruction of vitamin D rather than being caused by its deficiency.   It is interesting that here in the US, the only legal claim which can be made in regards to vitamin D supplementation is that it can reduce the risk of osteoporosis, yet in the European Union, products can also state that vitamin D helps with normal function of the immune system, and normal inflammatory response.

    Most work in animals has really only centered on bone metabolism and calcium homeostasis, which is not surprising as the link to overall health and human nutrition is somewhat new.  Human nutritionists have now recognized that the amount of vitamin D needed to prevent rickets is inadequate to maintain other vital functions.  However, remember that random supplementation is never advised, and results in humans can never be directly extrapolated to animals in general, let alone horses specifically.   In addition, over-supplementation is never recommended.  While vitamin D toxicity is unlikely, it has occurred experimentally.  Vitamin D toxicity is marked by calcification of the soft tissues, and can be fatal.  Interestingly, it is actually used in lethal doses in baits as a rodenticide, when combined with calcium.

    So what does all of this mean for your horse?   It has been shown repeatedly that vitamin D in the blood is higher in the summer than the winter, which would certainly make sense as the sun is the principle source of vitamin D for most horses. Most management systems where the horse is regularly pastured or turned out  where it is exposed to sunlight will be sufficient to provide enough vitamin D.  However, many performance horses are stalled almost continuously, even more so in the winter.  For these horses, it is important that they do receive a feed which contains vitamin D. In the past, the vitamin D requirements of the horse have been stated to be 300 IU of vitamin D per 100 lbs.  Currently, the requirement is 6.6 IU/kg bwt for horses not exposed to sunlight, with the exception of growing horses.  Growing horses requirements are stated to be much higher, 22.2, 17.4, 15.9 and 13.7 IU/kg bwt for horses from 0-6, 7-12, 13-18 and 19-24 months respectively.  This is due to the need to form bone properly as the animal grows.  To provide a quick example, a 650 lb horse who is 15 months old would require:

    650 lbs converted to kg-  295 kg * 15.9 IU/kg bwt = 4698 IU of vitamin D per day.

    Next month will discuss the role of vitamin E and its  various effects on the health of your horse.

  • The Puppy Who Came with Godwinks

    Written By Jenny Pavlovic

    For Christmas, my mom gave me a book about Godwinks, amazing “coincidences” that are really winks from God. My mom said that God winked when, through an amazing set of “coincidences”, my cattle dog puppy Bandit found me in 2004. This story is told in “Bandit, My Bolt Out of the Blue, My Miracle” (http://www.omegafields.com/blog/bandit-my-bolt-out-of-the-blue-miracle/).

    When I was a kid, we couldn’t have a dog because my sister was allergic to them. We had gerbils, and when I was nine years old my parents indulged my love for animals by letting me get a pony. But I still also longed for a dog. I walked the neighborhood dogs and took care of them when their families went on vacation. Yet, I wanted a dog of my own.

    When I was twelve years old, a puppy appeared on our front porch one morning, lost and scared and hungry. My mom found the small brown and white puppy with floppy ears when she stepped outside to pick up the morning paper. We brought the puppy in, but Mom said it was only until we found his real owners, period! I headed off right away on my bike to get him some dog food from the store. The puppy, probably a border collie-spaniel mix, became my constant companion. We bonded right away and he even slept by my bed at night.

    A couple of days later, the phone rang and when my mom answered I heard her talking about the puppy. His original owners were on the phone. I got a knot in my stomach and held my breath. I could hear Mom’s side of the conversation. Some kids had won the puppy at the fair. They had been playing tennis across the street when the puppy wandered away and got lost. But the conversation didn’t simply end with exchanging information on how to return the puppy. The family already had a dog that didn’t get along with the pup and their mom said they couldn’t keep him. Amazingly enough, I was listening to a negotiation! By then, we had already learned that my sister wasn’t allergic to the puppy, and my parents decided to keep him! I already thought of him as my dog. The kids had called him “Fuzzer” and the name stuck, silly as it was.

    God must have developed an eye twitch, as the kids won Fuzzer at the fair, brought him home, decided to take him to the tennis court across the street and lost him, little Fuzz safely crossed our busy street and wandered over to our front porch, and we found him the next morning. We had him long enough to discover that my sister wasn’t allergic to him. Then when we found out who the puppy belonged to, their mom put her foot down and said they couldn’t keep him. That’s an impressive string of Godwinks!

    My first dog was delivered with a series of Godwinks, and dogs (including 8 State Hurricane Kate) have been finding me ever since. What Godwinks occurred as special animals and people came into your life? If you pay attention, you will begin to notice more Godwinks.

    Note: Canine Shine helps keep your dogs healthy during stressful winter months. In February, my dog Chase will begin a monthly gig at the local library, where children read to him. We like to support our local library and Chase loves listening to children read stories as they develop their reading abilities. Canine Shine gives Chase a soft and shiny coat that makes snuggling with him extra special for the children.

  • Get Ready For A Spring Tack Sale: Find Cash In Your Tack Box

    Find Cash In Your Tack Box:  Get Ready For A Spring Tack Sale

    Nearly every 4-H horse club and many breed and show organizations now sponsor spring tack sales or swaps.
    “For horse owners these tack sales can bring in some extra cash and they’re also an incentive to clean out tack boxes and tack rooms,” says Laurie Cerny, editor and publisher of www.good-horsekeeping.com.  “If you’re not using it, or if it doesn’t fit – whether it’s tack or show clothing, it should go.” 

    Cerny warns against keeping tack and apparel for sentimental reasons.  “These things get dated in a couple of years, so keeping a show halter from your retired showmanship horse is probably not a good idea.”  She added, “When tack and show clothing are still in style, and if these things are in good shape, you should be able to get at least 50-60 percent of what you paid for it new.  Years down the road you might be lucky to even find a buyer for it.”

    Here are some tips for selling items at an upcoming tack sale:

    • Clean tack and wash and press clothing, blankets, and other soft goods.

    • Get your items gathered and organized at least a week before the sale.

    • Mark sale tags with the size and price of the item.  Either purchase tags from an office supply store, or make your own – using small squares of paper.  These can be stapled to the clothing tag (located in the collar of a shirt or in the waist band on a pair of pants), or around the browband, cheek piece, etc. of a halter or bridle.  Self-adhesive labels should only be used on items where they have a solid surface for adhering to - like on the shank of a bit, or on the cover of a book.

    • Use rubber bands or string to tie together reins and other strap items like lead ropes and lunge lings.

    • For large ticket items (like saddles, show halters/bridles, chaps, etc.) make take-away cards for potential buyers that have the item, price, and your phone number on them.  These cards can be really helpful at large tack sales - where shoppers may want to look around first, but then forget where your table is at, etc.  It also gives them a way to contact you after the sale – should you still have the item and they still want to buy it.

    • Take at least $20 to make change with (13 singles, one five, and two dollars in quarters).

    • Use a fanny pack as a moneybox.  This way your change and the money you take in are always on you.  Have a separate location to keep checks and to put large bills and extra cash once you start to make sales.

    • Take a variety of bags.  Buyers really appreciate having something to carry their purchases in.

    • Arrive to the sale location early and be ready at least 15 minutes before the start of the sale.  There’s nothing worse than trying to set up while people are shopping your table.

    • Think height when it comes to organizing your table.  Take a couple of milk crates (or similar containers) to set on your table.  These will give you more display space, and will give buyers somewhere else to look besides your table.
     

6 Item(s)