Monthly Archives: September 2015

  • Flaxseed - Sweet Itch - Pruritus - Culicoides

    Review Written By Dr. Kate LeVasseur

    To Review Complete study and references >>>> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC227015/

    One of the most common concerns among horse owners is how they can improve their horse’s hair coat to appear sleek and shiny. Many people already have a basic understanding that supplementing flaxseed in their horse’s diet improves hair coat quality and appearance by providing essential fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) or EFAs. But what many people don’t know are the benefits that flaxseed provides in addition to making the hair coat show quality. Continue reading

  • Storing round bales outside

    Written By: Krishona Martinson, PhD, U of M

    Storing round bales outside on the ground is a very common practice and represents the most economical method of hay storage. However, it also has the greatest potential for loss due to weather.

    Round bales typically have a higher storage loss than small square bales, especially when stored outdoors. Studies have shown outdoor storage losses range between 5 and 35 percent depending on the amount of precipitation, storage site location, and original condition of the bale. Most of the losses that occur during outside storage take place on the bottom of the bales where moisture levels remain highest and air movement is the lowest. Continue reading

  • Importance of colostrum

    mare and foal

    Written By: Jennifer Johnson, DVM, University of Minnesota

     

    Colostrum, or "first milk", is the first milk that a mare makes to feed her foal. Consumption of an adequate amount of colostrum is critical to the health and well-being of the newborn foal. Colostrum provides infection-fighting antibodies , vitamins, minerals, energy, protein, fat and acts as a laxative to help the foal pass the meconium (first stool). Unlike human babies, when foals are born they have no disease-fighting antibodies in their blood. Therefore, a foal must ingest colostrum in order to absorb the antibodies needed. These antibodies are made by the mare and will hopefully provide specific protection for the bacteria and viruses in the foal's environment. This is called passive transfer. Continue reading

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