Omega Fields

  • Egg Bound Hens

    Written By Lisa Steele, Fresh Eggs Daily

    Considering that a chicken lays an egg every 26 hours or so, it's no wonder that things sometimes go wrong. Occasionally, an egg will get stuck in a hen’s oviduct and she will become egg bound. Signs of an egg bound hen include sitting on the ground or dragging wings, fluffing up, lethargy and closed eyes. Frequently, an egg bound hen’s tail will be down and most likely she will be straining or pumping her backside. Upon closer examination you may notice liquid dripping from her vent. You may even be able to feel an egg-shaped lump.

    Causes of Egg Binding - More common in young pullets, egg binding could be due to a large or double yolked egg that is too large to pass through, genetics, stress, dehydration, internal worms, low-quality feed, poor health or a calcium deficiency. Calcium is needed for proper muscle contraction. Too much protein in a hen's diet can also cause egg binding.

    You want to handle your egg bound hen carefully to avoid breaking the egg inside her. A broken egg can become infected and lead to peritonitis, which is caused by egg material stuck inside the hen and must be treated immediately with an antibiotic and probiotic powder to build up her good bacteria. Even if the egg is not broken, the condition must be treated quickly. An egg bound hen will die if she is not able to pass the egg within 48 hours, so once you have made your diagnosis, treatment should start immediately.

    Treatment for Egg Binding - Bring the hen into the house and soak her in a plastic tub in your bathtub.

    Submerge her lower body and vent in warm water with some Epsom salts for about 20 minutes, gently rubbing her abdomen. Remove her gently from the bath and towel dry her, blotting her feathers carefully, then blow dry her with a hair dryer set on low heat.

    Rub some vegetable oil around her vent and very gently massage her abdomen once more then put her in quiet, dark location - such as a large dog crate or cage. You want to create moist heat, so set the cage over a pan of hot water, put a heating pad and towel on the bottom of the crate or set up a heat lamp, then drape a towel over the cage.

    Give your egg bound hen an eyedropper of Nutri-Drench and 1cc of liquid calcium. Then give her some time to herself. Repeat the soak in the tub every hour or so until she lays her egg.

    As a last resort, a visit to a vet is recommended or, if you can see the egg, you can try to carefully extract the contents of the egg using a syringe. Then you will need to gently crush the shell, keeping the fragments attached to the membrane and remove it using vegetable oil squirted in and around the vent. This is risky and carries with it the danger of your hen contracting peritonitis, so should ONLY be used after all other remedies have been tried.

    Fortunately, being egg bound is not all that common, and there's a good chance you may never have a hen suffer from it, but it's still good to know the signs and how to treat it.

  • Kidding

    Written By Janice Spaulding, founder of Goat School

    Kidding time is the most exciting time on the farm! Will it be a doeling or a buckling? What will its markings be? What color? How many?? Such fun!

    The big kidding question always is: How do I know when my goat is ready to deliver? Watch your does. The poor girl may get crankier as she gets closer. Some does produce copious amounts of mucous, very stringy, hanging down, and even dragging on the ground. This is a sign that labor is imminent. Our Boer doe, NanC, used to go 4 or 5 days with a drippy butt, other goats do not have any mucous at all.

    Watch their udders. You will see changes as their delivery date draws near. In some goats the udder expands greatly over time, others will expand just a few hours before delivery. As labor gets closer the udder gets very big, solid feeling, and almost shiny in appearance, often called “strutted” udder.

    For Angora’s, (or any longer haired goat) make sure, if the goat hasn’t been sheared, that you crutch her well ahead of time and also trim around the udder. Crutching is cutting away all the hair on the back end and down the back of the legs and around the udder and teats. It will get ruined during birthing process anyway. Make sure the teats are easy to find for those little ones.

    One of the best indicators of impending labor is “calling”. Your doe will walk around looking like she is in a panic, searching for something. She will call out over and over again. Sometimes it’s a very soft call, sometimes a gentle talking to her belly and sometimes a really loud yelling. She is calling to her baby which hasn’t been born yet. At this stage, she should be kidding fairly soon and should be put in a kidding pen.

    If your doe has been calling, it will get more frantic and the calls could end with a prolonged grunting noise. A water bubble will often be visible and will usually break. She will get up, lie down, squat, get up, pee, lie down and so on; so many times it will make you crazy.

    When we hear the sounds of labor beginning over our baby monitor, off we go to the barn. If you have a close relationship with your doe, she may not want to have her kids without you being around! They can hold back their labor for quite some time.

    Once you see that the goat is actually in labor, you will want to put down clean hay in her area and get your gloves ready. DO NOT put your fingers or hands inside the goat unless absolutely necessary! If it becomes evident that the doe needs some help, put some K-Y Jelly on your fingers and insert one finger, massage the orifice of the vulva gently from inside. This will usually relax and lubricate enough for the baby to slide out.

    The kid’s position should be a nose between two little hoofs. This is, of course, the perfect position but it doesn’t always happen. Don’t be alarmed if you see a little tongue hanging out of the kid’s mouth! They sometimes are born this way, and it’s really quite cute!

    After the kids are born, they need to be wiped down quickly. I usually bring the baby around to the front of mom and wipe along with her licking. We work together to keep baby warm and get it dried off. If there is more than one kid, make sure both or all of the babies are kept in front of the doe. You certainly don’t want her to reject any babies.

    Be aware that sometimes the kids are bright yellow when they are born. This will be more evident in the Angora’s. They look like little yellow chicks! This is normal. It usually happens when a baby is a day or two over due. The baby’s internal organs are beginning to function and the baby passes some of the meconium into amniotic fluid, thus coloring it and the baby with it.

    Sometimes the goat’s teat will have a little waxy plug in the end of it, or over the orifice. This is more common in Angoras. This plug needs to be removed so the baby can nurse. By milking a small amount from each teat you will be assured that the teat is free from this plug. If nothing comes out, gently scrape the end of the teat with your finger nail. In stubborn cases, warm cloths will help. Some kids can nurse the plug right out, but others can’t so always make sure you have taken this step.

    Once you are confident that kidding is complete, this is the point where your doe needs a reward. We fill a small bucket with warm water and molasses (1 gallon of water, ¼ to ½ cup of molasses. It gives the doe some extra energy, plus most of them love the taste. They are also very thirsty at this stage.

    During the three or four days that the doe is in her kidding pen with her new kids, I give her extra grain. About 1 ½ times her regular ration along with some supplement.

    Normally the afterbirth (placenta) usually will be delivered in an hour or two. (However, it can take up to 24 hours ) Try to watch for it. We dispose of it in empty grain bags unless the doe decides to eat it. I know this is gross, but there are all kinds of nutrients and vitamins in the placenta that is good for the doe and helps in her healing after birthing. There are also hormones that trigger milk production. Some will eat it and some most definitely will not.

    One of the reasons to sequester your doe during labor and afterward is for her and her babies to bond. Very rarely, but it does happen, a doe will reject her kid. You will have to take the upper hand here. The mom will have to be held while someone else gets the babe on the teat. A 4X4 kidding pen is very adequate for even the biggest of goats.

    We weigh the babies immediately after birth, and again when the babies are 24 hours old. This will assure you that they are nursing properly. We weigh very often during the first month, just to keep track of what kind of gain the kids of each mom has.

    Mom will get a very yucky, crusty area on and around her tail. Once she is finished streaming (getting rid of what is left in her uterus) it gets all dried up and cakey. You can trim it off with some scissors. Some of it will pull off and parts will just brush off. It is best to clean her up especially in fly season!

    Let’s address the kids and their poop. The first poop is a black tar like substance called meconium which hopefully, mom will clean up for you! Otherwise, it’s difficult to clean up. Warm water and a good butt soak will work nicely to soften and loosen up this gooey substance. I also use baby shampoo if necessary.

    Once the meconium passes, the next bowel movements will be bright yellow, about the same color as yellow mustard. Mom will usually clean this up too, but if she doesn’t you will have to. If this yellow poop cakes over the anal opening, it will get hard and make it impossible for the little one to have a bowel movement. This will eventually cause death. Through the years, I have found this tends to be more of a problem with Angora’s. I think it’s more difficult for the mom to clean up all those little curls around the butt area.

    Most of the time you can pull the cakey mess off, other times it will take a butt soak.

    Want to learn more? Come to Goat School! Our spring class will be held Saturday, May 24th and Sunday, May 25th with a Goat Milk Soap and Goat Cheese Making Class on Monday, May 26th! Go to www.goatschool.com/id28.html for more information!

  • Water Losses in Horses

    Written By Dr. Kris Hiney

    This month we will discuss the most important nutrient in your horse’s diet, but maybe the most overlooked. Because providing our horse with water may seem obvious, many believe water requirements may not warrant discussion. But how much do you really know about how much your horse should be drinking per day?

    The amount of water a horse needs to consume per day is directly related to how much water the horse loses per day. Horses lose water through four ways: their manure, urine, sweat, respiration, and if a broodmare, lactation. All of these variables must be taken into account when determining how much water our horses should be drinking. When we increase these losses due to variations in diet, work or environment, we must allow the horse greater access to water. Sometime that may mean we need to be creative in encouraging the horse to consume more water.

    One of the greatest water losses to a horse is often overlooked, horse manure. While we tend to think of it as a rather solid form that we must continually scoop, pick up or shovel, horse manure is mainly water. This is especially true if the horse is eating primarily roughages. On an all forage diet, horse manure contains as much as 72-85% moisture. In fact, the water lost through their manure may represent almost 60% of a horse’s daily water intake. If we switch the horse to a grain based diet, the manure actually becomes much drier. Now, that does not mean that this may be a great strategy to minimize water losses. Overly dry feces can lead to impactions and colic, which is certainly to be avoided! When a horse consumes forage, it must be digested through fermentation which requires a fairly liquid environment in the hindgut and therefore normal gut health. In part, this is why it is recommended to always provide at least 1% of a horse’s body weight in forage per day. Consumption of forage therefore encourages water intake.

    Variations in diet beyond just forage versus grain, can influence water losses in horses. The total amount of feed the horse eats will alter its water requirements. As consumption of feed increases, the horse must consume more water in order to allow normal digestive processes to occur. While we mentioned already that forage does increase water losses and thus water intake, the type of forage the horse consumes alters its water needs. Obviously fresh pasture grass contains a much higher moisture content compared to dry feed which is typically only 10-15% moisture. Growing grass may contain as much as 80% moisture. When taking into account the total amount of grass a horse can consume, simple grazing may approach a horse’s basic water requirements. Don’t be surprised then if your horse visits the water trough less frequently while he is grazing compared to when you feed hay.

    Urine obviously contributes to water losses in horses, but remember that the volume of urine may reflect the water balance in the horse. Urine actually represents the most variable water loss in the horse, as other losses are more directly tied to diet, metabolic demands and environment. Some horses simply consume more water than others, and as a result will excrete more dilute urine in order to rid the body of excess water. Alternatively, if we fail to adequately meet our horse’s water needs, the kidneys will act to limit water losses and concentrate the urine. Additionally, if the feed contains components that need to be excreted by the kidney, water losses will increase. For example, when horses are fed protein beyond their requirements, the extra amino acids are broken down into components that can be used for fuel. This process involves the removal of the nitrogen found in amino acids. The kidney incorporates the excess nitrogen into urea, which is then excreted through the urine. Excess electrolytes, in particular sodium and potassium, must also be excreted by the diet. If you have a horse that likes to consume his salt at a greater rate, you may notice that his stall may be wetter than horses which do not perform such a practice. If you own an enthusiastic salt eater, you may want to limit his intake to strictly his salt requirements.

    Sweat represents a tremendous variable in water losses for the horse, dependent on temperature and exercise. Remember that horses are most similar to humans in that we both dissipate heat through sweating, compared to other species that may rely primarily on respiratory cooling or panting. As horses must breathe through their nostrils, panting is simply not an option for them. Increasing the environmental temperature can increase evaporative losses between 45 to almost 400% of the horse’s normal water losses. The addition of exercise on top of environmental losses can quickly lead a horse to dehydration and heat stress if water losses are not replenished. For example, cross country horses have been reported to lose as much as 50-75 lbs of water during a competition due to the sustained duration of activity. Respiratory water losses are also directly tied to temperature and work load as these have the greatest influence on respiration rate. Horses increase respiration rate, either to aid in cooling, or due to the increased demand for oxygen delivery to the muscle tissue. However, relative to sweating, respiratory losses are relatively minimal.

    The good news is that horses, through training or adaptation to their environment, do become more efficient at heat dissipation and begin to minimize their water losses. However, full acclimation to increased environmental temperatures may take up to 3 weeks. While it would be nice if weather patterns would gradually increase over time allowing our horses to adapt, we all know that this is simply not reality. Therefore, when the temperature gage rises dramatically, or even sporadically, we must acknowledge that our horses may not easily be able to dissipate heat. This will require more caution on our part when working our horses during this abrupt changes in temperature.

    Lactating mares also have a significant loss of water through the milk. The amount of milk produced can be very variable between mares, with an average of 2 to 3% of their body weight per day. This will increase their water requirements somewhere between 50 and 75% over their normal requirements. If we also remember that lactating mares have a very high energy demand on their bodies, their feed intake increases as well. Remember that as feed intake increases, the horse must increase their water consumption to maintain digesta flow, and to counter the losses of water through the manure.

    So what does all of this mean relative to what we need to offer our horses? My basic recommendation is to always allow the horse access to water beyond what they are willing to drink. In general a horse will consume around 10 gallons of water per day. This is easily accomplished by offering two full buckets twice a day. However, if you find that the bucket is empty when it is time to refill it, consider hanging an additional bucket. Your horse will thank you!

    Next month we will delve more deeply into the current research on strategies to maximize your horses water intake. We all are familiar with the adage that you can lead a horse to water but you can’t make them drink. However, sometimes we really need them to drink! We will also discuss some feeding strategies that may help your horse stay hydrated through the various activities he may encounter such as traveling, endurance exercise, or exercise during hot temperatures. Remember, there is more to know about water than just filling a bucket!

  • Omega Fields Presents Keys to Preventing Laminitis Article by Dr. Kris Hiney

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields’ Equine Nutrition Advisor, Kristina Hiney, Ph.D., has introduced a new article about key strategies in preventing laminitis in the equine. The article has been published in one of our Health E Letter issues, Omega Fields’ monthly, digital newsletter, and is also posted on their website, www.OmegaFields.com.

    In the article, Dr. Hiney draws on her extensive personal knowledge, experience with equine nutrition and physiology, and scientific studies to try to identify which individuals may be at risk, and other strategies that may be employed to reduce your horse’s risk.

    Dr. Hiney states, “While the outward appearance of your horse may give you an indication to whether they are susceptible to laminitis, there may be more to it than just which horses are overweight. There certainly appears to be a genetic link to laminitis.”

    If owners wish to try and avoid the development of insulin resistance, the diet the horse receives may be critical. There is evidence that diets which avoid high amounts of sugars and starches, and have a low glycemic response, resulting in less insulin release. For horses which still need a significant amount of calories, diets which are fat and fiber based and properly formulated, rather than those which provide a higher glucose or insulinemic response, may prevent the development of insulin resistance. Certainly just monitoring body condition in the horse may be the easiest way to avoid insulin resistance. Although, if you ask any horse owner if that is easy you may get a different response! In addition, horses which receive regular exercise seem to be fairly protected against laminitis. However, it is difficult to know whether the exercise regimen aids in increasing insulin sensitivity, or is simply protective against obesity.

    To read the complete laminitis article by Dr. Hiney that discusses the genetic role, obesity and insulin resistance, diet and lifestyle management, please visit our horse articles section on our website. <http://www.omegafields.com/blog/cat/articles-equine-articles/post/keys-to-preventing-laminitis/>

    Dr. Hiney has been working with Omega Fields since 2008 to expand our connection with our customers, giving them the nutrition and health information from scientific perspective they would like to know. Each month, Kris presents a feature article concerning horse health in Dr. Kris's Korner, her column in the Health-E-Letter. Click here to sign up for your free Health-E-Letter subscription delivered to your email address!

    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, goat, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    For further information, contact Allison Kuhl, Omega Fields Director of Business Development at 920-550-4061, ext. 119; email Allison@omegafields.com; or visit www.OmegaFields.com or www.FLAX.com

     

  • Omega Fields is proud to announce it will be a GOLD level benefactor for the ECIR No Laminitis Conference

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. is proud to announce our continued support of the No Laminitis! Conference for 2013.  Presented by the ECIR Group, Inc., with Keynote Speaker Dr. Eleanor Kellon. To be held September 27 - 29, 2013 in Jacksonville, Oregon
    Dr. Kellon has used and recommends Omega Horseshine® for all IR and Cushing horses.

    Omega Fields’ goal is to promote and support optimal equine health through knowledge, instruction and practice.  Once considered a death sentence, Laminitis is often the first sign that leads to a diagnosis of Equine Cushing’s disease or Insulin Resistance.  This conference will provide new and emerging information to help recognize how laminitis can be prevented and treated with background, new and emerging information on equine insulin resistance and pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (Cushing’s Disease) and including drug, nutritional management and hoof physiology and function.  Full conference information can be found at; www.nolaminitis.org/program.

    “On behalf of the hardworking conference organizers and non-profit officers and directors, we offer a special thanks to all of you for your support. Omega Fields in an important product used by many of our members.  In addition to the information and new research being discussed at this conference, it is also a major fundraiser for 2013.  Funds raised here will allow us to continue to expand our outreach to owners, vets, farriers, trimmers and others struggling to help the horses in their care.” Says Nancy Collins, ECIR Group, Inc. – Treasurer/Director.

    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, goat, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    For further information, contact Allison Kuhl, Omega Fields Director of Business Development at 920-550-4061, ext. 119; email Allison@omegafields.com; or visit www.OmegaFields.com or www.FLAX.com
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  • Omega Fields sponsors Illinois Quarter Horse Association Charity Trail Ride

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. is proud to announce our support for the second year of the ILQHA Charity hosted by the ILQHA Recreational Riding Program.  To be held September 26- 29, 2013 in the Shawnee National Forest, at the New Hope Hill Campground.  Click here for more details; http://ilqha.com/recreational_riding.html

    “The Illinois Quarter Horse Association Recreational Riding Program has been hosting the trail ride for 7 years in a row now. This trail ride is not only for the enjoyment of the riders, but it also works to inform people and keep trails open and available for use by all horse lovers throughout the state of Illinois. Each year the committee also partners up with a local charity and gives at least 50% of the ride's proceeds to the charity. This year's charity is the Massac County Youth fair, which covers 13 counties in Southern Illinois.  Businesses like Omega Fields help us to raise money for these charities by donating items that can be auctioned off, raffled off, or bid on through silent auction. Without generous businesses like Omega Fields, our organization would not be able to support the local charities that we have for the past 7 years. The committee truly appreciates the donation of products from Omega Fields; they are great products, and the committee members often get into bidding wars over them!” stated Haley and Heidi A. Coop, 2013 ILQHA Trail Ride Directors.

    Omega Fields’ president, Sean Moriarty, stated “we are very glad to be a small part of the successful fund raising efforts of the ILQHA and are proud to be associated with such a great group doing even greater things to promote better horsemanship and the equine lifestyle”.

    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, goat, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    For further information, contact Allison Kuhl, Omega Fields Director of Business Development at 920-550-4061, ext. 119; email Allison@omegafields.com; or visit www.OmegaFields.com or www.FLAX.com

     

  • Omega Fields is Proud to annouce our Continued Relationship with Beverly Gray as Official Spokesperson

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. is proud to announce our continued relationship with the amazing Beverly Gray and her champion horse “Jolly Sickle”.  (www.bevgrayusa.com).  Omega Fields’ goal has always been to extend our tag line “Nutrition for a Healthy Life” into a person’s entire experience by promoting a connected message of nutrition and healthy living for them and the animals they love.  We feel strongly that Bev’s reputation, methods and character are a great fit with ours and we are thrilled to have her as our Spokesperson. ” says Moriarty, President of Omega Fields.  

    Beverly and “Jolly Sickle” had another fantastic “Gold Medal” year winning National Mountain Region Champion and National 100 Mile Champion!  According to Beverly, “It was another pinnacle endurance riding year that included 750 miles, 14 races with 9 firsts and 11 Best Condition awards throughout 3 regions. I’ve never had a horse partner in the National Standings for Best Condition in my entire 18,500+ miles of competition.  I didn’t see the possibility of a National BC until this past fall.  The drama of 3 consecutive high vet scores and 3 consecutive Best Condition awards at the Moab Canyonlands Ride was the climax of our campaign.  Jolly Sickle and I have shared so much together – a once in a lifetime sunrise, the noon sun streaking through a thick forest heavy with fog, or alone with the sound of the musical tempo of hooves over the crimson Moab slickrock.  Riding Jolly Sickle is poetry in motion! I am grateful and humbled to be his partner and friend.” Beverly also stated “I believe Omega Fields nutritional program for my champion Arabian and I were major factors in our success! Thank you Omega Fields.”

    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, goat, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    For further information, contact Allison Kuhl, Omega Fields Director of Business Development at 920-550-4061, ext. 119; email Allison@omegafields.com; or visit www.OmegaFields.com or www.FLAX.com

     

  • Omega Fields debuts new RFDtv commercial on the Parelli Natural Horsesmanship Program!

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. has aired its new 30 second commercial on the RFDtv channel during the Parelli Natural Horsemanship program as one of Parelli’s official sponsors.  According to Moriarty-Omega Fields President, “the spot features Pat and Linda’s personal experience with our Omega Horseshine® and Omega Nibblers® products and their personal endorsement.  Linda Parelli said that this was the first supplement she really felt excited about.  We couldn’t be more pleased with our relationship and their enthusiastic support after seeing the significant difference our products have made in their horses.”  You can view the 30 second spot as well as an extended 90 second version on our YouTube channel; www.youtube.com/user/OmegaFieldsInc.

    Omega Fields has been an Official Sponsor of Parelli Natural Horsemanship, www.parelli.com,  since December of 2012.  You can see us on their RFDtv program, as part of their national tour events as well as being featured in their Savvy Times magazine.  Check us out at; www.omegafields.com, and learn more about the reason for Pat and Linda Parelli’s enthusiasm for Omega Fields’ products.

    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, goat, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    Contact: Allison Kuhl _ Director of Business Development, Omega Fields, Inc. • (920) 550-4061 ext. 119 • Allison.kuhl@omegafields.com, www.omegafields.com

  • Omega Fields is Proud to announce our Newest Spokespeople – Lee & Hallie Hanssen!

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. is proud to announce our new relationship with the champion barrel racers and professional trainers, Lee & Hallie Hanssen (www.melvinranch.com and www.hanssensranch.com).  Omega Fields’ goal has always been to extend our tag line “Nutrition for a Healthy Life” into a person’s entire experience by promoting a connected message of nutrition and healthy living for them and the animals they love.  We feel strongly that Lee & Hallie’s reputation, methods and character are a great fit with ours and we are thrilled to have them as our Spokespeople. ” says Moriarty, President of Omega Fields.  

    As active members of the Barrel Futurities of America and the W.P.R.A (Hallie), some notable accomplishments for Hallie include; BFA Derby World Champion, WPRA Reserve 2x World Champion, Fizzbomb Futurity Champion, 5-States Futurity Champion and Multiple Ft. Smith Futurity Finalist. And for Lee; multiple slot race top 10 placing, Top 10 Old Fort Days Futurity and 3rd at BBR Futurity Finals.  “We are very excited to have Lee & Hallie as spokespeople and feel that they truly represent the ideals we have as a company. The combination of their experience and knowledge as well as outstanding character make them a great example of what we stand for as a company” according to Moriarty – President of Omega Fields.  

    As stated by Lee & Hallie “Hallie and I have loved horses since we can remember.  What started out as a simple hobby has turned into a career and an enduring passion.  Competing at the professional level is very demanding on our horses.  That is why we trust Omega Fields to help our horses look and feel their best.  Over the years we have fed many great products, and Omega Fields flax based supplements continue to help our horses perform at the top of their game.  When you look good, you feel good and our horses look awesome with help of these outstanding products.  We are grateful to be a part of their team.”

    Check out our latest Omega Grande product video and spokesperson, Hallie Hanssen on our YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qtmVXCrVvg.

    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® is recognized as a minority-owned business. Its mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, goat, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    Contact: Allison Kuhl _ Director of Business Development, Omega Fields, Inc. • (920) 550-4061 ext. 119 • Allison.kuhl@omegafields.com, www.omegafields.com
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  • Does the Season Affect Your Feeding Management?

    Written By Dr. Kris Hiney

    Does the season affect your feeding management? Winter is the season of short days, long cold nights and reduced riding time for us and our horses. Often what we feed our horses in the winter shifts as their energy requirements change, as well as the feedstuffs we might be using. That shift in seasons may mean we need to look at our feed sources and our supplement regimen more closely.

    To begin our discussion, remember that a horse’s energy requirements do change with the seasons. Cold weather creates additional caloric demands on the horse’s body in order to regulate its body temperature. When temperatures drop below a certain point, referred to as an animal’s lower critical temperature, it must expend more energy in order to maintain its own body temperature. For horses which are acclimated to cold temperatures (meaning we have allowed them to grow a hair coat and they have been housed outdoors), this lower critical temperature is usually around 5° Fahrenheit. When temperatures drop below this point, we really should be feeding our horses more. In general, for every two degrees drop in temperature, the horse needs 2.5% more calories to maintain its’ body temperature. Therefore, if it gets down to about 10 below, your horse will need 20-25% more feed! These numbers do not consider wind chill factors, which can drive up heat loss substantially. Bottom line, in light of this year’s extreme cold, if your horse is living outside this winter, you may find yourself going through your hay supply much faster than you had anticipated.

    How you choose to supply that energy to your horse may be important as well. There are several strategies which may be employed to augment your horse’s calorie deficiency. One easy way to meet energy requirements, along with adding to the heat produced by the process of fermentation in the hindgut, is to simply feed more hay. Consumption of hay has a higher heat increment (or heat associated with digestion) than other feeds, therefore it helps to keep your horse warm at the same time. In addition, more calories can be provided by choosing a higher energy concentrate, such as one with higher concentrations of fat. There are many commercial feeds available with added fat, or choosing rice bran or a flax source may be an option. If choosing a fat-added feed, it will provide more calories to the horse without having to increase as greatly the volume of feed that you are using. Many horse owner’s also like to add warm mashes to their horses diet in the winter. This provides more energy to the horse as bran or pellet mashes are higher in caloric density than forage. The additional benefit is that you can increase your horse’s water consumption, which may have decreased in the winter if they do not have access to heated water. Finally, it just may make you feel good to feed your horse a nice warm mash on those cold days and nights.

    Obviously the manner in which we feed our horses also changes with the season. Ideally, horses are allowed opportunities to graze pasture grass in the temperate part of the year. However, with the fall and winter, horses in northern climates much be switched to an all harvested forage diet. While many of the nutrient components in harvested forage may be completely adequate for your horse, realize that the composition of plants does change with advancing maturity. In order to be tall enough to produce hay, grasses and legumes must reach a more mature state than a horse would typically select left to its own devices. In addition, some nutrients, such as vitamin A, do diminish over time. In particular, omega three fatty acids are found in smaller quantities in hay than in fresh growing grass. As we have changed how we manage all of our production animals and switched to more grain based diets, they now consume much more n-6 fatty acids versus n-3 fatty acids than when they were more pastorally raised. In fact, knowledge of the higher content of n-3 fatty acids in grass is in part what has led to the rising consumer popularity of grass fed beef. Grazed cattle consume much more n-3 fatty acids compared to traditionally raised feed lot cattle which have diets much higher in n-6 fatty acids. The diet the animal is on directly influences the n-6 to n-3 fatty acid ratio in their body tissues. Diets higher in n-3 fatty acids have been shown to be anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and cardio protective. While we may not think about horses in quite the same way, or feed them a concentrate based diet like feed lot cattle, the same process of incorporation of more n-3 fatty acids into their tissues occurs when horses graze or are supplemented with n-3 fatty acids. Ideally, our horses also should be consuming more grass and n-3 fatty acids, and less n-6 fatty acids which are found so abundantly in concentrates. However, even switching to a harvested forage based diet can alter the n-6 to n-3 ratio compared to a fresh grazing. Hay making can result in a loss of fatty acids of more than 50%, especially of linolenic acid, with a comparative increase in n-6 fatty acids. In a study using ewes, grass fed ewes had more milk and tissue n-3 fatty acids than ewes fed a hay diet. But obviously we cannot always feed grass to our horses. Therefore, in order to mimic the natural diet of the horse, and provide them the positive benefits of n-3 fatty acids, we can supplement them in other ways. Flax is a rich source of linolenic acid which horses readily consume. Therefore, in the winter, why not try a flax supplement and at least return your horse’s diet to summer, even if the wind is still howling!

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