Omega Fields

  • What Do Goats Really Eat?

    Written By Janice Spaulding, founder of Goat School

    Volumes can be written about this subject alone. This article will cover basic information on feeding and minerals.
    A few years ago we lost a beautiful doe in her last few weeks of pregnancy. Opting for a necropsy was one of the wisest decisions we have ever made. The necropsy gave us “inside” information on how a goat makes and distributes fat throughout their body. The outward appearance of a goat is not always informative on the inside condition.

    This was a large doe, though not one that would be considered “fat”. As it turns out, her problem was the internal fat storage she had developed throughout her life. We had only owned her for about six months, so, we were not privy as to how she had been fed in her early life. This fat, which packed her internal body cavity, was a major contributing factor to her demise. Her liver had caramelized and her systems had shut down.

    It is difficult when those big, beautiful caprine eyes are looking at you with the “please feed me, I’m melting away to nothing” look.  Don’t give in to it!  Over feeding can eventually kill your goat. Under feeding will do the same thing.  So how do you reach a happy medium?

    Hay, hay, hay, lots of good quality hay is a major component to raising healthy, happy goats. A goat needs four percent of its body weight in dry matter per day. That’s what they will actually eat; it does not include the other two or three pounds that they spilled on the ground trying to get to that little choice morsel that they see in the very center of the pile. Of course, once it’s on the ground, it has gotten stepped on, peed on, and pooped on, so don’t expect to ever see your goats bend down and eat it!

    Now, let’s talk water.  It doesn’t matter what kind of container you use, but you have to KEEP IT CLEAN! Goats will not drink dirty water. With the bucks, you can run into problems with urinary calculi from not drinking enough water to balance the phosphorous and calcium they ingest. Angora goats are even fussier than meat or dairy goats are! One little piece of poop and they will avoid that water like the plague.


    If your water containers start building up algae, you are doing a poor job in your management program. Washing with a little bleach, swished around with a brush and rinsed with water will keep your containers clean. Goats are not dirty animals, don’t treat them that way. If you wouldn’t drink out of it what makes you think your goats will?
    Salt blocks are a necessity!  Our motto has been “keep your goats thirsty”, especially your boys, so that they will drink plenty. Just like humans, the more water they drink; the healthier they will be! A red salt block, also known as mineral blocks or brown blocks is a good choice because they contain not only salt, but also trace minerals such as iron, manganese, copper and iodine.

    Now you get my “feed sermon”, sheep feed is for sheep, goat feed is for goats, cattle feed is for cattle, and etc.
    If you buy a bag of feed that says it is for sheep or goats, you are buying health problems for your goats.
    There are so many great goat grains on the market, why jeopardize your goat with a grain formulated for another type of animal?

    Having the tags from several different brands of grains and comparing them, I noticed that one of them specifically says “Do not feed to sheep, product contains copper”, another states “this feed contains supplemental copper, do not feed to sheep” and still another says it’s a Sheep and Goat Feed and it’s for “growing, breeding and lactating sheep and goats”. What do you see wrong with the third one?  Could it be that there is something missing in it that goats need but could poison sheep? Your right, it’s copper. GOATS NEED COPPER. Excess copper will kill sheep.

    An interesting disclaimer that one of the brands listed was: “Results from use of this product may vary based upon differences in customers’ management, health and sanitation, breeding, genetics and feeding”. Even the grain dealers understand about health, sanitation and feeding!

    Copper is necessary for the absorption and utilization of iron in all goat breeds.

    Copper deficiency in a goat is an ugly thing! It causes the goats bones to become brittle  just like a human’s bones when they have rickets.

    Without iron the goat will rapidly develop anemia.  Iron also helps oxidize other vitamins for muscle growth, formation of red blood cells and bone structure. It is stored in the liver and is supplied through the intestinal walls.

    The daily ration should be approximately one pound per doe and one to two pounds per buck (depending on size).
    Another factor in keeping a healthy goat is plenty of “outside” time. Remember vitamin D comes from sunshine and it helps utilize other vitamins in the system properly. You need to get those “barn potatoes” outside! A good indication of lack of vitamin D is “ring around the eyes”. Sometimes the hair actually falls out in this area.

    Kids need proper nutrition too!

    Creep feeding is a means of providing feed for your kids. If you notice your kids at feeding time, they try desperately to get to the feed and keep getting knocked to the side by the bigger stronger goats!

    Adult meat goats are very possessive about their feed and will not let kids other than their own near the feed. Angoras on the other hand are much more laid back and share the feed. Of course, your dairy goats are being fed at milking times, so they will always get the feed they need.

    A separate area that adult goats cannot access will help grow the kids really quickly. They will be in and out of the creep feeder almost constantly snatching little snacks throughout the day.

    Why creep feed?
    It will increase weight gain, kids will reach a target market weight and can be marketed at a younger age. Creep fed kids will have a greater weight per day of age. The conversion of creep feed to body weight gain is a very efficient process.
    Kids begin to nibble hay and feed at a very early age. Some kids may have a functional rumen and be chewing their cud by two weeks of age.

    A creep feeding areas should be located near water, in the shade if possible and near the place where the kids like to loaf. Make sure the feed in the creep is dry and fresh. Never let it run out of feed completely. Clean it out in a timely fashion.  Remember, kids are incredibly fussy and will pick through the grain to find what they are interested in eating.

    Lastly, and, most importantly, for peace of mind, is a good mineral supplement. If you are feeding your goats anything but a well formulated goat feed please make sure you are adding a good supplement to the feed, otherwise you are doing a great disservice to your goats.

    If your goats are on a browse based nutrition program, please remember that a supplement becomes a critical component to their well-being. While the nutritional value of browse often reaches its peak in mid-summer; other times of the year it may not contain enough nutrients to provide your goats with a balanced diet to meet all of their needs.

  • Omega Fields is Now on Instagram

    Omega Fields is now on Instagram!

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc.  has joined the popular photo sharing site Instagram.  We will be posting photos of the Parelli Natural Horsemanship tour stops, other special events from our Ambassadors and Spokespeople, retail partner locations, our own and customer animal photos, so join in the fun and follow us on Instagram!  Simply use the hashtag #omegafields when posting photos on your Instagram account. 

    We will also be creating contests to give away a month’s supply of product by tracking posts with the #omegafields.  And finally, we will have a contest at each Parelli event for those who post a picture of themselves with Pat or Linda Parelli or our Omega Fields booth, just use the #omegafields and post to your Instagram account. 

    See you on Instagram!
     

  • Omega Fields Announces its New YouTube Channel

     

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. is proud to announce the creation of our new YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/OmegaFieldsInc ).  We’ll be posting product videos ((http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iclcWjRylps),  behind the scenes video of our photo shoots for new products, most recently our new goat supplement, Omega Kid & Goat Care.  There will be video testimonials and an inside look into the competitions and events taken by our Spokespeople and Ambassadors around the country as well as our RFDtv commercials.

    Please subscribe to our channel to join in the fun and see interesting aspects and find information about the products and company you love!

  • Omega Fields and Missouri Fox Trotters Horse Breed Association, A Great Partnership

     

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. is proud to announce our continued relationship with the Missouri Fox Trotters Horse Breed Association (MFTHBA).  “Since 2010 Omega Fields has participated with the MFTHBA membership of approx. 4,500 people,  in providing nutritional articles from our equine science consultant, Dr. Kris Hiney, as well as offering MFTHBA members a 5% discount on all Omega Fields products”” says Sean Moriarty – President of Omega Fields, Inc.

    “The Missouri Fox Trotting Horse Breed Association has greatly appreciated our continued relationship with Omega Fields,” said MFTHBA President, Dr. Joyce Graening.  “Omega Fields’ focus on quality products and superior customer service makes it a great match to the values and principles of the MFTHBA.  Our members greatly appreciate their support of the Missouri Fox Trotting Horse”.  An further, “Our partnership is based on a desire by both organizations to continue to educate horseman on the benefits of paying attention to nutrition as a core principal in having a more satisfying experience with your horse “says Moriarty.  MFTHBA communicates with its members through e-mails, newsletters and a semi-monthly magazine called Fox Trot U.  Information about MFTHBA can be found at their website at; www.mfthba.com

    About the Missouri Fox Trotting Horse Breed Association (MFTHBA)
    Fox Trotters originated in Missouri as ranch horses bred for smooth riding gaits as well as stamina for mountain riding and heavy ranch and farm work. They are known for versatile athleticism, the naturally smooth flat walk and fox trot gaits, and an endearing, trainable personality. Since 1948, the MFTHBA has worked to promote the Missouri Fox Trotter and support a registry for horses that meet the breed standards of gait and conformation. Today there are more than 97,000 registered Fox Trotters worldwide.

  • Omega Fields Announces its Horseshine Products Available in Canada

     

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. is excited to announce our new distribution relationship with Canadian Centurion Supply located at; PO Box 21116, 10 Humber Street, Stratford, ON N5A 7V4.  “Omega Fields will market “Omega Horseshine®”, our award winning flax based omega-3 nutritional supplement for horses, and the flagship product of our brand in Canada as “Horseshine” says Sean Moriarty – President of Omega Fields, Inc.

    Our new relationship kicks off at “The Mane Event” in Reed Deer, AB on Apr 26-28, 2013. “Horseshine” products will be available to consumers at the show courtesy of Canadian Centurion Supply’s retail dealer called “The Horse Store” located at 2612 Kensington Road NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 3S5, 403-270-7700. After “The Mane Event” horse show, Canadian Centurion Supply will begin distributing “Horseshine” to retailers across Canada.  In addition we will also be offering the “Horseshine” products at our booth with the Parelli Heart & Soul Tour in London ONT June 8-9, 2013 through another of Canadian Centurion Supply’s retail dealers, Wilson Tack and Veterinary Supplies.

  • Omega Fields Highlights Relationship with Lisa Steele of Fresh Eggs Daily

     

    Newton, Wisconsin – The backyard poultry market has been a steadily growing focus for Omega Fields and we are very pleased to support key players communicating with people with a passion for chickens such as Lisa Steele author of the blog “Fresh Eggs Daily”, says Moriarty – President-Omega Fields.

    Lisa writes a regular blog called “Fresh Eggs Daily” found on her website; www.fresh-eggs-daily.com. Lisa says about her mission and focus, Fresh Eggs Daily® is dedicated to inspiring readers to live a simple, natural farm life and raise their chickens as naturally as possible. Most of our readers raise backyard flocks, although some haven’t taken the plunge yet and are still in the ‘research’ stage. Others follow because our photos and stories recall memories of raising chickens when they were young or of visiting their grandparent’s farm as children. We attract novices as well as more experienced chicken keepers, challenging them all to raise their flocks to be the happiest and healthiest they can be. In addition to giving tips and advice on raising backyard flocks, we also share DIY projects using repurposed materials, vegetable and herb gardening tips, making all natural products for the home and coop, and recipes using fresh eggs and homegrown produce.

    In addition to her blog that is read by an estimated 25,000 people, Lisa reaches over 30,000 Facebook friends (https://www.facebook.com/FreshEggsDaily?ref=ts&fref=ts); over 7,500 Pinterest followers(http://pinterest.com/fresheggsdaily/) ; and almost 1,000 followers on Twitter.  People are talking about chickens!

    Omega Fields sponsors an ad on her blog site, offers special coupons and contests for her Facebook and blog readers as well as provides helpful research content that Lisa shares with her eager audience.

  • Omega Fields Highlights it's Marketing and Education Relationship with Kathy Mormino, The Chicken Chick

     

    Newton, Wisconsin – The backyard poultry market has been a steadily growing focus for Omega Fields and we are very pleased to support key players communicating with people with a passion for chickens such as Kathy Marmino aka “The Chicken Chick”, says Moriarty – President-Omega Fields.

    Kathy writes a regular blog called “The Chicken Chick” found on her website; www.the-chicken-chick.com. Kathy says about her mission and focus, “I routinely refer my Facebook audience to my blog for the information and articles that may be of assistance to them in caring for their chickens.  The focus of my blog is informing and educating readers on topics relevant to their pet chickens such as: how hens make eggs, how to make a poultry nipple waterer, chicken first aid kit essentials, cooking with eggs, etc.  My background as an attorney has uniquely prepared me to ensure that thorough research is done and proper citations are provided to substantiate information I share, which I believe lends credibility to my work and loyalty from my readers.”

    In addition to her blog that is read by an estimated 21,000 people, Kathy reaches almost 30,000 Facebook friends (http://www.facebook.com/Egg.Carton.Labels.by.ADozenGirlz?fref=ts), publishes helpful videos on her YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg9P80BP7u2UYtsBG4vc-aQ) and has an obvious passion for caring for her own chickens!

    Omega Fields sponsors an ad on her blog site, offers special coupons and contests for her Facebook and blog readers as well as provides helpful research content that Kathy shares with her eager audience.

  • Omega Fields Introduces Pin It To Win It Pinterest Contest

     

    Newton, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. announced it will begin their first ever “Pin It to Win It” contests on the popular social media site Pinterest, beginning in March 2013.  Participating in the contest requires no purchase and is very easy to enter.  To participate in the contests just make sure to log onto the Omega Fields Pinterest page at; http://pinterest.com/omegafieldss/ and follow our ‘Omega Fields Contest’ board. Please follow our fantastic boards and invite us to be a part of your community boards as well! You’ll find interesting and informative boards related to horse, dog, chicken and goat nutrition, great recipes using flaxseed, educational tips and articles and detailed information about Omega Fields’ products.

    Sean F. Moriarty, President of Omega Fields, Inc., said, “We have seen an a great response from our customers through social media and feel it is an effective way of interacting and offering those customers additional value for showing an interest in our products.”

  • Goats: Meat, Fiber and Dairy

    Written By Janice Spaulding, founder of Goat School

    It is a thrill and an honor to be able to write and share my goat knowledge with the subscribers of the Omega Fields Newsletters! Having raised goats for 25 years, and suffered through all the trial and errors, my husband, Ken and I, have accumulated a vast knowledge of the nuances of raising several varieties of goats including dairy, meat, and fiber.

    In 2004 I came up with an idea to answer all of the questions we were continually getting, not only from new goat owners, but also from seasoned breeders. Goat School® was born. We started on a cold November afternoon, lasted for about 3 hours, and included 12 people. It has now grown into a three day event and peaked at 112 attendees.
    Over the past eight years the most often asked question has been: “What type of goat would you recommend for us”?   There are so many things to take into consideration. This article will touch on the different types of goats, and, can help you decide in what direction you would like to take your goat raising experience.

    First things first; what are the types of goats? There are three; meat, fiber, and of course the dairy breeds.
    Goats in general, are friendly, inquisitive, nosy, loving, charming creatures that will return to you as much love as you give to them. A goat that is well socialized, well nourished, and well cared for, will be a friend for life. They love to help with chores, (try changing a light bulb on a ladder with 4 or 5 goats around and you’ll see what I mean!) and, if given a chance, they will happily clean out your garden or flower beds!  

    MEAT GOATS:  All goats have goat meat but not all goats are meat goats. You can harvest meat from all of the different breeds of goats, but there are some breeds that have been raised specifically for meat. Meat breeds are bigger and more muscled. They tend to be very large, statuesque animals. Some breed names include Boer, Kiko, Spanish, Savanahs, Myotonic, and Arapawa.

    Because of their size, Boer bucks have been crossed with other breeds to inject “hybrid vigor”. Hybrid vigor presents the possibility of obtaining a genetically superior offspring by combining the primal virtues of its parents.   We used our Boer Buck “Rocky” to breed some of our Angora does. The offspring were growing at a rate of ¾ of a pound per day!  It took no time at all for the kids of these matings to outgrow their moms. It was quite comical to see these very large 2 month old kids trying to get under their small statured dams to nurse.

    Meat goats because of their mature size and rapid growth might give the impression that they require large amounts of feed, nothing could be further from the truth!  We found that one pound of a balanced goat grain per full grown doe was sufficient! By providing your meat goat with a good healthy diet of browse, hay, clean water, minerals, vitamins, and a small amount of grain guarantees they will thrive, produce great offspring, develop healthy muscling, and become a good foundation stock for your growing herd!

    FIBER GOATS:  Fiber breeds require more hands on work than meat breeds. As we raised Angora goats for over 20 years, I will do a little “ruminating” on that subject.  Angoras are the only goats who produce hair.


    Because they grow about an inch of hair a month, Angoras need to be sheared twice a year. We always sheared in the spring right before kidding season, (this worked out great because it alleviated messy, ruined fleece because of kidding fluids) and again in the fall, just before breeding time.  As male goats in rut tend to be a little smelly, shearing before breeding kept the fleeces clean and odor free.

    Angoras need plenty of protein to grow all of that beautiful mohair fleece. A lack of protein in their diet causes lack-luster, thin, unattractive coats. As the mohair is the end product for these goats, you must feed them properly. Keep in mind that the extra protein also causes fast growing hoofs which may need to be trimmed more often than most other types of goats.
    DAIRY GOATS:  Milk producing goats are certainly the most work intensive of all breeds but continue to be my favorites. I love the twice a day interaction with them. They are friendly, happy go lucky animals that can start each and every day with a smile. Dairy goats need to be milked at least once a day, and more commonly twice a day, so be prepared for that commitment!

    Over the years, we’ve had Oberhaslies, Nubians, Sables, Toggenburgs, Saanans, and Alpines. There are other great milk breeds out there besides the ones I mentioned.  My recommendation before you purchase any type of milker is that you taste their milk. All of the milks are great, but some taste different than others. For instance a lot of folks dislike Oberhaslie milk and others simply love it!


    Another caveat when you are purchasing milkers for hand milking; try milking the goat! Make sure your hands fit their teats. Some goats have big teats and others really small ones, so this is important. We always recommended that newbies buy their first two goats as milking adults.  Get a feel for it with a “seasoned professional” doe, and go from there.
    And of course I have to mention “pet goats”.  These come in many sizes and shapes. Two neutered males (wethers) make great buddies and can be taught to pull carts or go packing with you! Nigerian Dwarf goats are the cutest, most comical little characters that can keep you well entertained.

    Along with all the love, fun, and enjoyment you can receive from your goats, comes one problem that is not often discussed; what to do when you have a goat in your herd, of any breed, that is churlish, difficult to deal with, mean, nasty, or a general pain in the neck? These goats need to go where they will best be served, an appointment with the processor, or as we have come to call it “freezer camp”! I realize that folks can have considerable sums of money tied up in a goat and have a hard time justifying sending them to the processor, but, owning animals is a responsibility and part of that responsibility is to not pass your problems on to an unsuspecting individual. Please do not pass an unwieldy goat on to an unsuspecting new owner! I can’t say this strong enough, a difficult goat needs to go in the freezer. How will you feel if you sell one of these unpredictable animals to someone and the new owner gets hurt?

    Why do some goats, especially bucks, develop these problems? Usually it is because the buck was kept by himself. Goats are herd animals and need the companionship of other goats to keep their healthy attitudes. A buck who has a buddy, either another buck (it doesn’t matter what breed) or a neutered male (wether) will keep the buck occupied, exercised, and most of all friendly.

    When kept alone, a buck will be constantly seeking out a play mate. When you go into his pen, you automatically become his play mate! A game of head butt with a full grown buck will be memorable to say the least.

    Want to know more about goats, come to Goat School®! Goat School® is a comprehensive learning experience! You will not only learn about goats, but you will also make invaluable new friends, meet like-minded folks, and build networking opportunities.

    Visit our web site www.goatschool.com and see when and where the next Goat School is!

    We have a great book available with lots of information about raising goats. The “Goat School® Manual” is a compilation of some of the  information from our Goat School® classes. For more information click on the Goat School Shop tab at www.goatschool.com

  • Spraddle Leg

    Written By Lisa Steele, Fresh Eggs Daily

    Hopefully you will never have to worry about a chick with spraddle leg ( also called splayed leg), but as is the case with everything else chicken-related, it's always best to be prepared ...just in case.

    Spraddle Leg is a condition that a chick is either born with or develops within the first few hours of life whereby one or both legs slip out to the sides making them unable to stand or walk.

    Spraddle leg can occur during incubation or the hatching process if the temperature is too high or varies too much during the incubation period or if the hatch is difficult for the chick. A less common cause can be a vitamin deficiency. The more common cause is an incubator or brooder floor that is too slippery for the chick to grip, which causes the legs to slide to one side. As a result the chick's legs muscles don't develop properly because of the lack of traction.

    To try and prevent this condition, a sheet of paper towel or rubber shelf liner should always be put in the incubator just before the lockdown.

    This will give the newly hatched chicks something to grip onto.

    In the brooder box, newspaper should NEVER be used as the only floor covering.  Especially when it gets wet, it is too slippery and the main cause of spraddled leg.  Instead, I cover a few layers of newspaper with a sheet of shelf liner.  The rubber surface, just as in the incubator, provides a nice textured surface for little feet.

    I change the newspapers and shelf liner out as needed, rinsing the shelf liner off and reusing it, and after a few days, add a layer of pine shavings on top.
    Spraddle leg is easily correctable, but if not addressed quickly, the chick will not be able to get to feed and water and can die.

    What you need to do is hobble the chick's legs.  The easiest way is to cut a thin piece of vet wrap (approximately 1/4" wide and 5" long) and loosely wrap it around each leg, connecting the ends in the middle, about an inch apart, in sort of a figure eight.

    The chick's legs should be about normal width apart when extended. If the chick can't stand up, you can make them a bit wider apart for better balance, but then bring them a bit closer together each day.
    You can wrap some First Aid Tape around the middle to keep it secured.
    Then be sure the chick has something it can easily walk on like paper towel, a bath towel or shelf liner.  At first the chick will have trouble standing up, but soon will be able to get around.  Ensure the chick has easy access to feed and water, but a shallow water dish with marbles or small stones in it is required so the chick doesn't fall in and drown.  Also it's best to keep the chick separate from other chicks at least until she learns to stand so she won't be trampled.

    At first it is helpful to support the chick and just let her try to stand and get used to having her legs underneath her.  Helping her get her balance will be beneficial and hasten her recovery.
    Unwrap the legs and check the chick's progress once or twice a day.  Leave the hobble on until the chick can stand and walk on its own. This could take from a few days to up to a week.  You should see results fairly quickly and soon your chick will be up and about.
    Then make a solemn vow - no more chicks on newspaper!

    !

Items 191 to 200 of 381 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. 18
  4. 19
  5. 20
  6. 21
  7. 22
  8. ...
  9. 39