Omega Fields

  • Omega Fields Introduces NEW Feed Math Calculator Tool on Website

    Sheboygan, Wisconsin – Omega Fields, Inc. is excited to announce its newly created Feed Math Calculator tool for its horse products. This new functionality will help our customers easily figure out how much product they need to order to optimize the nutrition for the number of horses they have (up to 4 at a time) based on what activity level each horse has. Once you populate the drop down boxes and press CALCULATE, the calculator will provide you with the recommended size of the product, how much is recommended to feed per/day/head, the approximate daily cost and then suggest order frequency for our Autoship & Save program.
    “We believe this new feature for our horse supplement products will improve customer satisfaction by helping our current and future customers decide on the best economical choices for our products,” said Omega Fields President, Sean Moriarty. The feed calculator tool is located on selected horse product pages underneath the product image and product size information. (https://www.omegafields.com/equine-products/omega-horseshine-27.html)

    About Omega Fields
    Omega Fields® mission is to offer the finest quality, most nutritious products at fair prices, and to provide outstanding customer service. Omega Fields wants its customers to have exceptional experiences with their products, staff, websites and retailers.

    Omega Fields is the first manufacturer in the animal health industry to use human-grade, non-GMO stabilized ground flaxseed, rich in fiber and antioxidants, and containing the optimum ratio of the full spectrum of Omega 3, 6, and 9 Fatty Acids for equine, canine, poultry and human nutrition. The innovative use of flaxseed milled with a unique stabilization technology ensures long shelf life and superior quality for Omega Fields’ products.

    Contact: Allison Kuhl _ Director of Business Development, Omega Fields

  • Bowed Tendons

    Annette McCoy, DVM, University of Minnesota

    "Bowed tendon" is the common name for superficial or deep digital flexor tendonitis. The superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) runs down the back of the leg and attaches to the long and short pastern bones. The deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) runs to the SDFT and attaches to the coffin bone. Together, these tendons aid in flexion of the lower limb.

    When either of these tendons becomes inflamed, it swells, causing it to look "bowed." The bow can appear anywhere from the carpus/tarsus (knee/hock) to the pastern region. The SDFT is much more commonly affected than the DDFT. Continue reading

  • Should I REFRIGERATE My Eggs?

    should i refridgerate my eggs

    Written By and Courtesy of Lisa Steele, Fresh Eggs Daily

    One of the most common questions I get asked by readers is if they need to refrigerate the eggs they collect from their chickens. The answer might surprise you.
    Continue reading

  • Companion animal welfare act

    The Animal Humane Society has seen a significant increase in equine related cases (both complaints and seizures) over the past two years. It is important to draw people's attention to the legal minimum requirements for horse ownership. According to Chapter 346 in the Minnesota Pet and Companion Animal Welfare Act, equines are defined as horses, ponies, mules, and burros. The Act outlines several requirements, including: Continue reading

  • Flaxseed - Sweet Itch - Pruritus - Culicoides

    Review Written By Dr. Kate LeVasseur

    To Review Complete study and references >>>> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC227015/

    One of the most common concerns among horse owners is how they can improve their horse’s hair coat to appear sleek and shiny. Many people already have a basic understanding that supplementing flaxseed in their horse’s diet improves hair coat quality and appearance by providing essential fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) or EFAs. But what many people don’t know are the benefits that flaxseed provides in addition to making the hair coat show quality. Continue reading

  • Storing round bales outside

    Written By: Krishona Martinson, PhD, U of M

    Storing round bales outside on the ground is a very common practice and represents the most economical method of hay storage. However, it also has the greatest potential for loss due to weather.

    Round bales typically have a higher storage loss than small square bales, especially when stored outdoors. Studies have shown outdoor storage losses range between 5 and 35 percent depending on the amount of precipitation, storage site location, and original condition of the bale. Most of the losses that occur during outside storage take place on the bottom of the bales where moisture levels remain highest and air movement is the lowest. Continue reading

  • Importance of colostrum

    mare and foal

    Written By: Jennifer Johnson, DVM, University of Minnesota

     

    Colostrum, or "first milk", is the first milk that a mare makes to feed her foal. Consumption of an adequate amount of colostrum is critical to the health and well-being of the newborn foal. Colostrum provides infection-fighting antibodies , vitamins, minerals, energy, protein, fat and acts as a laxative to help the foal pass the meconium (first stool). Unlike human babies, when foals are born they have no disease-fighting antibodies in their blood. Therefore, a foal must ingest colostrum in order to absorb the antibodies needed. These antibodies are made by the mare and will hopefully provide specific protection for the bacteria and viruses in the foal's environment. This is called passive transfer. Continue reading

  • Complications after colic

    Written By:Erin Malone, DVM, University of Minnesota

    Most colic episodes will fully resolve with no long lasting consequences. However, if toxins are released into the abdominal cavity or bloodstream, or if colic surgery is required, the horse will be at risk for other problems.

    Certain bacteria carry toxins. Many of these are found in the gut normally. If the toxin load overwhelms the usual defense mechanisms or if the gut is damaged and lets the toxins leak out, the horse can become ill. These horses may become shocky (poor blood flow causing an elevated heart rate and cool limbs), have reddened or purplish gums or red lines around the teeth, and may seem very depressed. Continue reading

  • Purchasing and using certified hay

    Written By: Krishona Martinson, PhD, U of M

    There is a growing demand for the use of certified noxious weed seed free forage as a prevention to limit the spread of noxious weeds. Noxious weeds compete against native plants, degrade ecosystems, and ultimately pose a threat to wildlife. A common characteristic of all noxious weeds are their aggressive, competitive behavior. Typically, they steal moisture, nutrients, and sunlight from surrounding plants, and can rob waterfowl and mammals of their food sources, nesting areas, and access to water. Continue reading

  • Colic Examinations

    Written By: Erin Malone, DVM, University of Minnesota

    When your veterinarian arrives to examine a colic, she/he will try to determine the severity and the general type of colic. It is very unusual to be able to diagnose the exact cause of colic, but she/he may be able to determine if it is more likely to be an impaction or gas colic, or if it may involve damaged bowel or toxemia. A routine physical examination will help determine the horse's cardiovascular status and identify signs of shock or toxemia. If the horse is very uncomfortable, the veterinarian may give a short acting analgesic/tranquilizer to aid in performing the examination. Depending upon the situation, the veterinarian may then pass a nasogastric tube (from the nostril to the stomach), perform a rectal examination and/or evaluate the abdominal fluid by doing a "belly tap". The nasogastric tube is passed to make sure there is no fluid build-up in the stomach. If there is fluid, this can be a life-saving measure (to prevent rupture of the stomach). If there is minimal fluid, the tube can be used to give mineral oil to the horse to lubricate any impaction. It may also be used to give water to the horse if it seems to be dehydrated. This has the added benefit of stimulating gut motility. A rectal examination allows the veterinarian to palpate structures in the caudal half of the abdomen. Sometimes an impaction can actually be felt. A rectal examination is always somewhat risky, because of the potential for tearing the rectum. Finally, if your veterinarian is concerned about infection in the abdominal cavity or about damage to the intestines, she/he may stick a needle in the abdomen and try to collect fluid for analysis. This test is most useful for determining if the horse needs surgery and is often not performed unless there is a problem getting the horse to a referral institution or if the colic persists. If you have taken your horse to an equine hospital, other bloodwork and tests (such as ultrasound and radiographs) may also be performed. Continue reading

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